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What the World’s Oldest People Eat (or Ate) Every Day Gallery

What the World’s Oldest People Eat (or Ate) Every Day Gallery


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Spoiler: They don’t necessarily stick to a healthy diet

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What the World’s Oldest People Eat (or Ate) Every Day

istockphoto.com

It’s something we’ve been told time and time again: If you want to live a long life, make sure that you eat a healthy diet. But judging by the diets of some very, very old people, eating a conventionally healthy diet may not necessarily be the secret to longevity. We tracked down the self-reported favorite foods and daily diets of the oldest people who ever lived, and they range from reasonable to bizarre to downright hilarious.

It’s pretty clear that the foods that we eat play a relatively small role in determining the length of our lifespans. Exercise, happiness, overall lifestyle, smoking and drinking habits, and just plain old luck (genetic and otherwise) also come into play.

For whatever reason, these people just kept on living, some well past 110. Most supercentenarians, as they’re called, are regularly asked if they have any secrets; several of the world’s oldest women have claimed that not getting involved with men had something to do with it, while other supercentenarians swear by specific foods. And as for what they ate and drank (or for those still living, eat and drink), it’s as diverse as the people themselves.

Oatmeal and... Martinis?

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Adele Dunlap was the oldest American at the time she passed away at age 114 in February 2017. She stuck to a diet of mostly oatmeal, according to USA Today, but historically ate basically whatever she wanted, and didn’t shy away from enjoying her martinis.

112-Year-Old Loved Beer and Chicken Wings

Left:Keith Homan/Shutterstock;Right:Shutterstock

Agnes Fenton, who passed away in August 2017 at 112, certainly seemed like one sassy lady based on her diet. She told NJ.com that up until recently, she had three Miller High Lifes and a glass of Johnnie Walker daily. She also enjoyed grits, buttered toast, orange juice, bacon, and sausage for breakfast. As for her absolute favorite foods? Those included green beans, chicken wings, and sweet potatoes.

World's Oldest Marathon Runner Drinks Milk and Avoids Fat

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Dharam Pal Singh, who controversially claims to be the world’s oldest marathon runner, swears he’s 120 years old. However, though his passport, voter ID card, and PAN Card (a tax identification in India) all confirm his claimed age, those who have seen or met him are extremely skeptical. Nevertheless, he is in incredibly good shape for whatever age he is. He credits his longevity to chutney he makes himself, lemon juice, and mineral water. In addition to being hydrated, he’s also sober — he quit drinking entirely and also omits fatty foods from his strict diet. The New York Times reported that he also eats sun-ripened fruit and cow’s milk and avoids sugar, tea, and even coffee.

117-Year Old Woman Ate Cookies Every Day

Emma Morano was famously the last living person who saw the 1800s, and was the world’s oldest person when she passed away at 117 in April 2017. She ate two raw eggs every day as a way to fend off anemia — advice she got from her doctor back in 1919 — as well as bananas and ladyfinger cookies. However, she told the Independent, “I do not eat much because I have no teeth.” She also swore off meat because she’d heard that it causes cancer — though her medical advice might be outdated.

Potatoes and Goat Cheese Were Staples of Woman's 'Natural' Diet

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Filomena Taipe Mendoza, who passed away at 117 in 2005, spent her entire life in a small Peruvian village in the Andes, and according to the Daily Mail, she told a government official, “My secret to longevity is a natural diet: I always ate potatoes, goat meat, sheep milk, goat cheese, and beans.” Everything she cooked came from her garden, and she never drank soda. That probably helped a whole lot — these 18 scary health effects of diet soda might just scare you into quitting.

Oldest Person Who Ever Lived Ate 2 Pounds of Chocolate Every Week

Left:istockphoto.com;Right:Shutterstock

On record as the oldest person who ever lived, Jeanne Calment lived to the ripe old age of 122, passing away in 1997. The French woman “used to eat more than two pounds of chocolate per week,” according to her obituary. The chocolate actually could have really benefitted her health. She also smoked and enjoyed a Sunday glass of port until age 120 — those choices probably didn’t.

109-Year-Old Woman Ate Oatmeal Every Morning

Gallan, who lived to be 109 before passing away in 2015, credited her long life to eating a warm bowl of porridge every morning. The Scot also told the Daily Mail, “My secret to a long life has been staying away from men. They’re just more trouble than they’re worth.”

Japanese Man Credited Long Life to Portion Control and Reading Newspapers

This Japanese man lived to be 116 before passing away in 2013, and he attributed his long life to portion control, walking, and reading newspapers. According to The Guardian, he ate a daily breakfast of rice porridge and miso soup. Learn to make authentic rice porridge here.

107-Year-Old Started Every Day With Coffee Spiked With Jim Beam

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Pennsylvania-born Mariano “Pops” Rotelli, who died in 2016 at 107 years old, told The Newnan Times-Herald that he drank a hot cup of coffee every morning — spiked with a shot of Jim Beam Black. “I’ve had a shot of whiskey in my coffee every morning for 100 years,” he allegedly said at an event. That would mean he began drinking at age 7 — but it apparently didn’t do much harm!

Woman Credited Long Life to Sleep and Sushi

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Born in 1898, Misao Okawa was the world’s oldest person when she died in 2015. She credited her long life to getting eight hours of sleep per night and eating plenty of sushi, especially her favorite, mackerel. According to The Japan Times, she also loved ramen noodles and beef stew, as well as hashed beef and rice.

Daily Breakfast of Bacon, Eggs, and Grits Kept 116-Year-Old Woman Alive

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The last American to have been born before 1900, Susannah Mushatt Jones passed away in May 2016 at age 116. According to her obituary, she enjoyed a daily breakfast of bacon, eggs, and grits until just a few weeks before her death.

98-Year-Old Yoga Master Doesn't Eat Meat

Left:istockphoto.com ;Right:Teresa K

Täo Porchon-Lynch is “only” 98, but she’s also a yoga master, and still teaches yoga to this day. “I love vegetables and fruit,” the former model and MGM actress told HuffPo. “I’m a vegetarian, but I do like to eat lobster and shrimp occasionally. I also like a glass of wine with my food. I don’t like to drink alone. Wine is good for the blood. I don’t eat for the sake of eating. No one should eat huge quantities of food. Be in touch with nature and the fruits of life. That will keep us healthy.”

117-Year-Old Jamaican Woman Loved Fish and Mangoes, Avoids Alcohol

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Violet Mosses Brown was born in Jamaica in March 1900 and passed away in September 2017 at 117 years old. She told the Jamaica Observer that she enjoyed fish, mutton, cow feet, and locally grown produce like mangoes, oranges, sweet potatoes, and breadfruit. She also didn’t drink, telling another Jamaican paper that she avoided “rum and dem tings.”

Oldest-Living Holocaust Survivor Ate Pickled Herring Every Day

Left:shutterstock ;Right:Wikimedia Commons;

Polish-born Yisrael Kristal used to be the oldest living man on earth as well as the oldest living Holocaust survivor before his death in 2016 at age 113. His daughter told The New York Times during his life that he ate to live instead of living to eat, and that “he enjoys daily helpings of pickled herring and, as a younger man in his 80s, had a taste for wine and beer.”

Oldest US Person Swears by Sweet Potatoes

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Lessie Brown, 113, is currently the oldest person in the United States. Her secret? According to her 88-year-old daughter Bernie Wilson, it’s sweet potatoes. Brown ate a sweet potato (often referred to as a yam) every single day until she was 110 years old, only changing her diet in her extreme old age.

100-Year-Old Woman Drinks Beer and Eats Potato Chips Every Night

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This Family's Secret Is Locally-Grown Oatmeal

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100-Year-Old Barmaid Eliminates Fruit and Dairy

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Marie-Lou Wirth is a 100-year-old barmaid who credits her long life to eliminating dairy and fruit from her diet. She’s not a big drinker, but enjoys alcohol in moderation. She has been serving wine and spirits since she was 14 years old.

Woman Attributes Long Life to Naps and Dark Chocolate

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Eunice Modlin, who celebrated her 102nd birthday in January, attributes her long life to chocolate and naps. “She has two pieces of dark chocolate a day and takes a nap,” granddaughter Tammy Modlin Gentry told The Daily Meal. Eunice exercises regularly and grew most of her own food. Fresh fish is among her favorite selections for dinner.

113-Year-Old Man Survived Mostly on Vegetables and Sponge Cake

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Francisco Nunez Oliviera died in January at age 113. His family credits his longevity to his diet, which mainly consisted of vegetables that he grew on his own land, a nightly glass of wine, and the same breakfast every single day: a slice of sponge cake made with olive oil and a glass of milk.

Woman, 104, Drinks Diet Coke Every Day

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What Really Happens To Your Body When You Eat Oats Every Day

A tub of steel-cut oats — or even the more convenient instant rolled oat variety — may not be the most aesthetically pleasing food in the breakfast aisle, but it is hands down the best choice. "I've asked a lot of elite endurance athletes about their breakfast foods, particularly before races, and oatmeal comes up again and again and again," Matt Fitzgerald — endurance coach, nutritionist, and author of The Endurance Diet — told Outside. That's not to say the food is only beneficial to athletes.

The Donnelly family, who achieved the Guinness World Record for the oldest living siblings in 2017, credits oats for their longevity. One of the siblings, Leo Donnelly, revealed in the documentary The World's Oldest Family (via Today) that he and his brothers and sisters each have a bowl of porridge "at around 10 p.m." each night. The next morning, they have another serving of "cooked oats, milk, [and] perhaps a spot of jam on top." Leo said he and his family are "living proof" of the benefits of porridge, but, what actually happens to your body when you, like the Donnelly siblings, eat oats each and every day? We've got the answer.


What Really Happens To Your Body When You Eat Oats Every Day

A tub of steel-cut oats — or even the more convenient instant rolled oat variety — may not be the most aesthetically pleasing food in the breakfast aisle, but it is hands down the best choice. "I've asked a lot of elite endurance athletes about their breakfast foods, particularly before races, and oatmeal comes up again and again and again," Matt Fitzgerald — endurance coach, nutritionist, and author of The Endurance Diet — told Outside. That's not to say the food is only beneficial to athletes.

The Donnelly family, who achieved the Guinness World Record for the oldest living siblings in 2017, credits oats for their longevity. One of the siblings, Leo Donnelly, revealed in the documentary The World's Oldest Family (via Today) that he and his brothers and sisters each have a bowl of porridge "at around 10 p.m." each night. The next morning, they have another serving of "cooked oats, milk, [and] perhaps a spot of jam on top." Leo said he and his family are "living proof" of the benefits of porridge, but, what actually happens to your body when you, like the Donnelly siblings, eat oats each and every day? We've got the answer.


What Really Happens To Your Body When You Eat Oats Every Day

A tub of steel-cut oats — or even the more convenient instant rolled oat variety — may not be the most aesthetically pleasing food in the breakfast aisle, but it is hands down the best choice. "I've asked a lot of elite endurance athletes about their breakfast foods, particularly before races, and oatmeal comes up again and again and again," Matt Fitzgerald — endurance coach, nutritionist, and author of The Endurance Diet — told Outside. That's not to say the food is only beneficial to athletes.

The Donnelly family, who achieved the Guinness World Record for the oldest living siblings in 2017, credits oats for their longevity. One of the siblings, Leo Donnelly, revealed in the documentary The World's Oldest Family (via Today) that he and his brothers and sisters each have a bowl of porridge "at around 10 p.m." each night. The next morning, they have another serving of "cooked oats, milk, [and] perhaps a spot of jam on top." Leo said he and his family are "living proof" of the benefits of porridge, but, what actually happens to your body when you, like the Donnelly siblings, eat oats each and every day? We've got the answer.


What Really Happens To Your Body When You Eat Oats Every Day

A tub of steel-cut oats — or even the more convenient instant rolled oat variety — may not be the most aesthetically pleasing food in the breakfast aisle, but it is hands down the best choice. "I've asked a lot of elite endurance athletes about their breakfast foods, particularly before races, and oatmeal comes up again and again and again," Matt Fitzgerald — endurance coach, nutritionist, and author of The Endurance Diet — told Outside. That's not to say the food is only beneficial to athletes.

The Donnelly family, who achieved the Guinness World Record for the oldest living siblings in 2017, credits oats for their longevity. One of the siblings, Leo Donnelly, revealed in the documentary The World's Oldest Family (via Today) that he and his brothers and sisters each have a bowl of porridge "at around 10 p.m." each night. The next morning, they have another serving of "cooked oats, milk, [and] perhaps a spot of jam on top." Leo said he and his family are "living proof" of the benefits of porridge, but, what actually happens to your body when you, like the Donnelly siblings, eat oats each and every day? We've got the answer.


What Really Happens To Your Body When You Eat Oats Every Day

A tub of steel-cut oats — or even the more convenient instant rolled oat variety — may not be the most aesthetically pleasing food in the breakfast aisle, but it is hands down the best choice. "I've asked a lot of elite endurance athletes about their breakfast foods, particularly before races, and oatmeal comes up again and again and again," Matt Fitzgerald — endurance coach, nutritionist, and author of The Endurance Diet — told Outside. That's not to say the food is only beneficial to athletes.

The Donnelly family, who achieved the Guinness World Record for the oldest living siblings in 2017, credits oats for their longevity. One of the siblings, Leo Donnelly, revealed in the documentary The World's Oldest Family (via Today) that he and his brothers and sisters each have a bowl of porridge "at around 10 p.m." each night. The next morning, they have another serving of "cooked oats, milk, [and] perhaps a spot of jam on top." Leo said he and his family are "living proof" of the benefits of porridge, but, what actually happens to your body when you, like the Donnelly siblings, eat oats each and every day? We've got the answer.


What Really Happens To Your Body When You Eat Oats Every Day

A tub of steel-cut oats — or even the more convenient instant rolled oat variety — may not be the most aesthetically pleasing food in the breakfast aisle, but it is hands down the best choice. "I've asked a lot of elite endurance athletes about their breakfast foods, particularly before races, and oatmeal comes up again and again and again," Matt Fitzgerald — endurance coach, nutritionist, and author of The Endurance Diet — told Outside. That's not to say the food is only beneficial to athletes.

The Donnelly family, who achieved the Guinness World Record for the oldest living siblings in 2017, credits oats for their longevity. One of the siblings, Leo Donnelly, revealed in the documentary The World's Oldest Family (via Today) that he and his brothers and sisters each have a bowl of porridge "at around 10 p.m." each night. The next morning, they have another serving of "cooked oats, milk, [and] perhaps a spot of jam on top." Leo said he and his family are "living proof" of the benefits of porridge, but, what actually happens to your body when you, like the Donnelly siblings, eat oats each and every day? We've got the answer.


What Really Happens To Your Body When You Eat Oats Every Day

A tub of steel-cut oats — or even the more convenient instant rolled oat variety — may not be the most aesthetically pleasing food in the breakfast aisle, but it is hands down the best choice. "I've asked a lot of elite endurance athletes about their breakfast foods, particularly before races, and oatmeal comes up again and again and again," Matt Fitzgerald — endurance coach, nutritionist, and author of The Endurance Diet — told Outside. That's not to say the food is only beneficial to athletes.

The Donnelly family, who achieved the Guinness World Record for the oldest living siblings in 2017, credits oats for their longevity. One of the siblings, Leo Donnelly, revealed in the documentary The World's Oldest Family (via Today) that he and his brothers and sisters each have a bowl of porridge "at around 10 p.m." each night. The next morning, they have another serving of "cooked oats, milk, [and] perhaps a spot of jam on top." Leo said he and his family are "living proof" of the benefits of porridge, but, what actually happens to your body when you, like the Donnelly siblings, eat oats each and every day? We've got the answer.


What Really Happens To Your Body When You Eat Oats Every Day

A tub of steel-cut oats — or even the more convenient instant rolled oat variety — may not be the most aesthetically pleasing food in the breakfast aisle, but it is hands down the best choice. "I've asked a lot of elite endurance athletes about their breakfast foods, particularly before races, and oatmeal comes up again and again and again," Matt Fitzgerald — endurance coach, nutritionist, and author of The Endurance Diet — told Outside. That's not to say the food is only beneficial to athletes.

The Donnelly family, who achieved the Guinness World Record for the oldest living siblings in 2017, credits oats for their longevity. One of the siblings, Leo Donnelly, revealed in the documentary The World's Oldest Family (via Today) that he and his brothers and sisters each have a bowl of porridge "at around 10 p.m." each night. The next morning, they have another serving of "cooked oats, milk, [and] perhaps a spot of jam on top." Leo said he and his family are "living proof" of the benefits of porridge, but, what actually happens to your body when you, like the Donnelly siblings, eat oats each and every day? We've got the answer.


What Really Happens To Your Body When You Eat Oats Every Day

A tub of steel-cut oats — or even the more convenient instant rolled oat variety — may not be the most aesthetically pleasing food in the breakfast aisle, but it is hands down the best choice. "I've asked a lot of elite endurance athletes about their breakfast foods, particularly before races, and oatmeal comes up again and again and again," Matt Fitzgerald — endurance coach, nutritionist, and author of The Endurance Diet — told Outside. That's not to say the food is only beneficial to athletes.

The Donnelly family, who achieved the Guinness World Record for the oldest living siblings in 2017, credits oats for their longevity. One of the siblings, Leo Donnelly, revealed in the documentary The World's Oldest Family (via Today) that he and his brothers and sisters each have a bowl of porridge "at around 10 p.m." each night. The next morning, they have another serving of "cooked oats, milk, [and] perhaps a spot of jam on top." Leo said he and his family are "living proof" of the benefits of porridge, but, what actually happens to your body when you, like the Donnelly siblings, eat oats each and every day? We've got the answer.


What Really Happens To Your Body When You Eat Oats Every Day

A tub of steel-cut oats — or even the more convenient instant rolled oat variety — may not be the most aesthetically pleasing food in the breakfast aisle, but it is hands down the best choice. "I've asked a lot of elite endurance athletes about their breakfast foods, particularly before races, and oatmeal comes up again and again and again," Matt Fitzgerald — endurance coach, nutritionist, and author of The Endurance Diet — told Outside. That's not to say the food is only beneficial to athletes.

The Donnelly family, who achieved the Guinness World Record for the oldest living siblings in 2017, credits oats for their longevity. One of the siblings, Leo Donnelly, revealed in the documentary The World's Oldest Family (via Today) that he and his brothers and sisters each have a bowl of porridge "at around 10 p.m." each night. The next morning, they have another serving of "cooked oats, milk, [and] perhaps a spot of jam on top." Leo said he and his family are "living proof" of the benefits of porridge, but, what actually happens to your body when you, like the Donnelly siblings, eat oats each and every day? We've got the answer.



Comments:

  1. Sheehan

    Instead of criticism write the variants is better.

  2. Hrapenly

    It goes without saying.



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