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A Tall Starbucks Latte Will Cost You a Staggering $12.32 in This Country

A Tall Starbucks Latte Will Cost You a Staggering $12.32 in This Country


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A new infographic shows the price-adjusted cost of a Starbucks latte in 44 countries, and Russia was the most exorbitant

In post-Soviet Russia, Starbucks latte buy you.

Starbucks lattes may be seen as a bit of a pricey indulgence in American culture, but buying a morning latte from the biggest coffee chain in the world is a lot more extravagant in certain other countries. dollars) of a tall latte from Starbucks in 44 countries around the world, adjusting for relative cost of other goods in those countries.

The results were pretty shocking. Russia had the worst price adjustment: A tall Starbucks latte there costs the equivalent of $12.32, a full four dollars more than the next-priciest latte ($8.21 in Indonesia). The country that was the closest to the United States in price was Australia, where a tall Starbucks latte will cost relatively $2.86, just nine cents more than an American version.

“In all countries, the relative cost of that Starbucks cup was higher than in the U.S., but there was variation in how much higher it was,” the Value Penguin research findings read. “The figure we show, then, essentially represents the sticker shock, from mild to major, that you’d feel if you lived in the country, making a local salary, and perused the prices at one of the local Starbucks. Put another way, it’s how pricey that drink would seem to a local latte drinker, in light of what most things cost in the country.”

The top 10 list of the priciest lattes is below, and you can find the full list here.

Russia $12.32

Indonesia $8.21

Vietnam $8.18

Thailand $8.04

India $7.99

Egypt $7.59

Malaysia $7.23

China $7.18

Saudi Arabia $7.08

Poland $6.74


This is the most expensive Starbucks in the world

Any Starbucks addict will admit buying coffee there isn't exactly a cheap stop. If you thought your seasonal drink addiction was putting a dent in your wallet, though, you'll cringe to see the prices at other locations around the world.

The Wall Street Journal converted the Starbucks prices in various cities around the world to US dollars, and the differences were staggering. A tall (aka "small"—find out why Starbucks has its own names for its drink sizes) latte in New York costs $3.45, which is already higher than the $2.95 national average. In London, on the other hand, you'd pay just $2.84, and you'll get the cheapest drink possible with a $1.53 Starbucks latte in Cairo. (Learn what the healthiest drink on any Starbucks menu is.)

On the other end of the spectrum, don't head to a Starbucks in Switzerland if you're looking to save money. Topping the list as the most expensive Starbucks, a latte in Zurich will cost $5.76—way more than you'd be shelling out at your local US Starbucks. (Find out where you'll find the most expensive McDonald's in the world.)

Of course, a dollar will go further in some countries than in others. Personal finance research firm ValuePenguin looked at Starbucks prices around the world. Analysts converted the cost of a tall latte into US dollars, then adjusted that number to match the relative cost of other goods in the country to account for the usual purchasing power.

Relatively speaking, Americans actually can get the cheapest Starbucks in the world—just $2.75 for a tall latte in January 2016 (though up to $2.95 by the end of 2017). Australians' Starbucks lattes are worth $2.86, Brits' are worth $2.88, and Canadians' and New Zealanders' are worth $3.06, according to ValuePenguin. Not a huge difference, but still something. (Here are 13 more things baristas won't tell you.)

When taking that into account, a Starbucks latte would be quite the luxury. For instance, you'd be paying a pretty penny in India ($7.99), Thailand ($8.04), Vietnam ($8.18), and Indonesia ($8.21).

Those don't even compare to the world's absolute most extravagant Starbucks, though. Stop for a latte in Russia and you're looking to drop the equivalent of $12.32 on your morning pick-me-up. Yikes! We'll skip the Starbucks stop in Russia and stick with tea like most Russians to get more bang from those bucks.

Sign up here to get INSIDER's favorite stories straight to your inbox.


This is the most expensive Starbucks in the world

Any Starbucks addict will admit buying coffee there isn't exactly a cheap stop. If you thought your seasonal drink addiction was putting a dent in your wallet, though, you'll cringe to see the prices at other locations around the world.

The Wall Street Journal converted the Starbucks prices in various cities around the world to US dollars, and the differences were staggering. A tall (aka "small"—find out why Starbucks has its own names for its drink sizes) latte in New York costs $3.45, which is already higher than the $2.95 national average. In London, on the other hand, you'd pay just $2.84, and you'll get the cheapest drink possible with a $1.53 Starbucks latte in Cairo. (Learn what the healthiest drink on any Starbucks menu is.)

On the other end of the spectrum, don't head to a Starbucks in Switzerland if you're looking to save money. Topping the list as the most expensive Starbucks, a latte in Zurich will cost $5.76—way more than you'd be shelling out at your local US Starbucks. (Find out where you'll find the most expensive McDonald's in the world.)

Of course, a dollar will go further in some countries than in others. Personal finance research firm ValuePenguin looked at Starbucks prices around the world. Analysts converted the cost of a tall latte into US dollars, then adjusted that number to match the relative cost of other goods in the country to account for the usual purchasing power.

Relatively speaking, Americans actually can get the cheapest Starbucks in the world—just $2.75 for a tall latte in January 2016 (though up to $2.95 by the end of 2017). Australians' Starbucks lattes are worth $2.86, Brits' are worth $2.88, and Canadians' and New Zealanders' are worth $3.06, according to ValuePenguin. Not a huge difference, but still something. (Here are 13 more things baristas won't tell you.)

When taking that into account, a Starbucks latte would be quite the luxury. For instance, you'd be paying a pretty penny in India ($7.99), Thailand ($8.04), Vietnam ($8.18), and Indonesia ($8.21).

Those don't even compare to the world's absolute most extravagant Starbucks, though. Stop for a latte in Russia and you're looking to drop the equivalent of $12.32 on your morning pick-me-up. Yikes! We'll skip the Starbucks stop in Russia and stick with tea like most Russians to get more bang from those bucks.

Sign up here to get INSIDER's favorite stories straight to your inbox.


This is the most expensive Starbucks in the world

Any Starbucks addict will admit buying coffee there isn't exactly a cheap stop. If you thought your seasonal drink addiction was putting a dent in your wallet, though, you'll cringe to see the prices at other locations around the world.

The Wall Street Journal converted the Starbucks prices in various cities around the world to US dollars, and the differences were staggering. A tall (aka "small"—find out why Starbucks has its own names for its drink sizes) latte in New York costs $3.45, which is already higher than the $2.95 national average. In London, on the other hand, you'd pay just $2.84, and you'll get the cheapest drink possible with a $1.53 Starbucks latte in Cairo. (Learn what the healthiest drink on any Starbucks menu is.)

On the other end of the spectrum, don't head to a Starbucks in Switzerland if you're looking to save money. Topping the list as the most expensive Starbucks, a latte in Zurich will cost $5.76—way more than you'd be shelling out at your local US Starbucks. (Find out where you'll find the most expensive McDonald's in the world.)

Of course, a dollar will go further in some countries than in others. Personal finance research firm ValuePenguin looked at Starbucks prices around the world. Analysts converted the cost of a tall latte into US dollars, then adjusted that number to match the relative cost of other goods in the country to account for the usual purchasing power.

Relatively speaking, Americans actually can get the cheapest Starbucks in the world—just $2.75 for a tall latte in January 2016 (though up to $2.95 by the end of 2017). Australians' Starbucks lattes are worth $2.86, Brits' are worth $2.88, and Canadians' and New Zealanders' are worth $3.06, according to ValuePenguin. Not a huge difference, but still something. (Here are 13 more things baristas won't tell you.)

When taking that into account, a Starbucks latte would be quite the luxury. For instance, you'd be paying a pretty penny in India ($7.99), Thailand ($8.04), Vietnam ($8.18), and Indonesia ($8.21).

Those don't even compare to the world's absolute most extravagant Starbucks, though. Stop for a latte in Russia and you're looking to drop the equivalent of $12.32 on your morning pick-me-up. Yikes! We'll skip the Starbucks stop in Russia and stick with tea like most Russians to get more bang from those bucks.

Sign up here to get INSIDER's favorite stories straight to your inbox.


This is the most expensive Starbucks in the world

Any Starbucks addict will admit buying coffee there isn't exactly a cheap stop. If you thought your seasonal drink addiction was putting a dent in your wallet, though, you'll cringe to see the prices at other locations around the world.

The Wall Street Journal converted the Starbucks prices in various cities around the world to US dollars, and the differences were staggering. A tall (aka "small"—find out why Starbucks has its own names for its drink sizes) latte in New York costs $3.45, which is already higher than the $2.95 national average. In London, on the other hand, you'd pay just $2.84, and you'll get the cheapest drink possible with a $1.53 Starbucks latte in Cairo. (Learn what the healthiest drink on any Starbucks menu is.)

On the other end of the spectrum, don't head to a Starbucks in Switzerland if you're looking to save money. Topping the list as the most expensive Starbucks, a latte in Zurich will cost $5.76—way more than you'd be shelling out at your local US Starbucks. (Find out where you'll find the most expensive McDonald's in the world.)

Of course, a dollar will go further in some countries than in others. Personal finance research firm ValuePenguin looked at Starbucks prices around the world. Analysts converted the cost of a tall latte into US dollars, then adjusted that number to match the relative cost of other goods in the country to account for the usual purchasing power.

Relatively speaking, Americans actually can get the cheapest Starbucks in the world—just $2.75 for a tall latte in January 2016 (though up to $2.95 by the end of 2017). Australians' Starbucks lattes are worth $2.86, Brits' are worth $2.88, and Canadians' and New Zealanders' are worth $3.06, according to ValuePenguin. Not a huge difference, but still something. (Here are 13 more things baristas won't tell you.)

When taking that into account, a Starbucks latte would be quite the luxury. For instance, you'd be paying a pretty penny in India ($7.99), Thailand ($8.04), Vietnam ($8.18), and Indonesia ($8.21).

Those don't even compare to the world's absolute most extravagant Starbucks, though. Stop for a latte in Russia and you're looking to drop the equivalent of $12.32 on your morning pick-me-up. Yikes! We'll skip the Starbucks stop in Russia and stick with tea like most Russians to get more bang from those bucks.

Sign up here to get INSIDER's favorite stories straight to your inbox.


This is the most expensive Starbucks in the world

Any Starbucks addict will admit buying coffee there isn't exactly a cheap stop. If you thought your seasonal drink addiction was putting a dent in your wallet, though, you'll cringe to see the prices at other locations around the world.

The Wall Street Journal converted the Starbucks prices in various cities around the world to US dollars, and the differences were staggering. A tall (aka "small"—find out why Starbucks has its own names for its drink sizes) latte in New York costs $3.45, which is already higher than the $2.95 national average. In London, on the other hand, you'd pay just $2.84, and you'll get the cheapest drink possible with a $1.53 Starbucks latte in Cairo. (Learn what the healthiest drink on any Starbucks menu is.)

On the other end of the spectrum, don't head to a Starbucks in Switzerland if you're looking to save money. Topping the list as the most expensive Starbucks, a latte in Zurich will cost $5.76—way more than you'd be shelling out at your local US Starbucks. (Find out where you'll find the most expensive McDonald's in the world.)

Of course, a dollar will go further in some countries than in others. Personal finance research firm ValuePenguin looked at Starbucks prices around the world. Analysts converted the cost of a tall latte into US dollars, then adjusted that number to match the relative cost of other goods in the country to account for the usual purchasing power.

Relatively speaking, Americans actually can get the cheapest Starbucks in the world—just $2.75 for a tall latte in January 2016 (though up to $2.95 by the end of 2017). Australians' Starbucks lattes are worth $2.86, Brits' are worth $2.88, and Canadians' and New Zealanders' are worth $3.06, according to ValuePenguin. Not a huge difference, but still something. (Here are 13 more things baristas won't tell you.)

When taking that into account, a Starbucks latte would be quite the luxury. For instance, you'd be paying a pretty penny in India ($7.99), Thailand ($8.04), Vietnam ($8.18), and Indonesia ($8.21).

Those don't even compare to the world's absolute most extravagant Starbucks, though. Stop for a latte in Russia and you're looking to drop the equivalent of $12.32 on your morning pick-me-up. Yikes! We'll skip the Starbucks stop in Russia and stick with tea like most Russians to get more bang from those bucks.

Sign up here to get INSIDER's favorite stories straight to your inbox.


This is the most expensive Starbucks in the world

Any Starbucks addict will admit buying coffee there isn't exactly a cheap stop. If you thought your seasonal drink addiction was putting a dent in your wallet, though, you'll cringe to see the prices at other locations around the world.

The Wall Street Journal converted the Starbucks prices in various cities around the world to US dollars, and the differences were staggering. A tall (aka "small"—find out why Starbucks has its own names for its drink sizes) latte in New York costs $3.45, which is already higher than the $2.95 national average. In London, on the other hand, you'd pay just $2.84, and you'll get the cheapest drink possible with a $1.53 Starbucks latte in Cairo. (Learn what the healthiest drink on any Starbucks menu is.)

On the other end of the spectrum, don't head to a Starbucks in Switzerland if you're looking to save money. Topping the list as the most expensive Starbucks, a latte in Zurich will cost $5.76—way more than you'd be shelling out at your local US Starbucks. (Find out where you'll find the most expensive McDonald's in the world.)

Of course, a dollar will go further in some countries than in others. Personal finance research firm ValuePenguin looked at Starbucks prices around the world. Analysts converted the cost of a tall latte into US dollars, then adjusted that number to match the relative cost of other goods in the country to account for the usual purchasing power.

Relatively speaking, Americans actually can get the cheapest Starbucks in the world—just $2.75 for a tall latte in January 2016 (though up to $2.95 by the end of 2017). Australians' Starbucks lattes are worth $2.86, Brits' are worth $2.88, and Canadians' and New Zealanders' are worth $3.06, according to ValuePenguin. Not a huge difference, but still something. (Here are 13 more things baristas won't tell you.)

When taking that into account, a Starbucks latte would be quite the luxury. For instance, you'd be paying a pretty penny in India ($7.99), Thailand ($8.04), Vietnam ($8.18), and Indonesia ($8.21).

Those don't even compare to the world's absolute most extravagant Starbucks, though. Stop for a latte in Russia and you're looking to drop the equivalent of $12.32 on your morning pick-me-up. Yikes! We'll skip the Starbucks stop in Russia and stick with tea like most Russians to get more bang from those bucks.

Sign up here to get INSIDER's favorite stories straight to your inbox.


This is the most expensive Starbucks in the world

Any Starbucks addict will admit buying coffee there isn't exactly a cheap stop. If you thought your seasonal drink addiction was putting a dent in your wallet, though, you'll cringe to see the prices at other locations around the world.

The Wall Street Journal converted the Starbucks prices in various cities around the world to US dollars, and the differences were staggering. A tall (aka "small"—find out why Starbucks has its own names for its drink sizes) latte in New York costs $3.45, which is already higher than the $2.95 national average. In London, on the other hand, you'd pay just $2.84, and you'll get the cheapest drink possible with a $1.53 Starbucks latte in Cairo. (Learn what the healthiest drink on any Starbucks menu is.)

On the other end of the spectrum, don't head to a Starbucks in Switzerland if you're looking to save money. Topping the list as the most expensive Starbucks, a latte in Zurich will cost $5.76—way more than you'd be shelling out at your local US Starbucks. (Find out where you'll find the most expensive McDonald's in the world.)

Of course, a dollar will go further in some countries than in others. Personal finance research firm ValuePenguin looked at Starbucks prices around the world. Analysts converted the cost of a tall latte into US dollars, then adjusted that number to match the relative cost of other goods in the country to account for the usual purchasing power.

Relatively speaking, Americans actually can get the cheapest Starbucks in the world—just $2.75 for a tall latte in January 2016 (though up to $2.95 by the end of 2017). Australians' Starbucks lattes are worth $2.86, Brits' are worth $2.88, and Canadians' and New Zealanders' are worth $3.06, according to ValuePenguin. Not a huge difference, but still something. (Here are 13 more things baristas won't tell you.)

When taking that into account, a Starbucks latte would be quite the luxury. For instance, you'd be paying a pretty penny in India ($7.99), Thailand ($8.04), Vietnam ($8.18), and Indonesia ($8.21).

Those don't even compare to the world's absolute most extravagant Starbucks, though. Stop for a latte in Russia and you're looking to drop the equivalent of $12.32 on your morning pick-me-up. Yikes! We'll skip the Starbucks stop in Russia and stick with tea like most Russians to get more bang from those bucks.

Sign up here to get INSIDER's favorite stories straight to your inbox.


This is the most expensive Starbucks in the world

Any Starbucks addict will admit buying coffee there isn't exactly a cheap stop. If you thought your seasonal drink addiction was putting a dent in your wallet, though, you'll cringe to see the prices at other locations around the world.

The Wall Street Journal converted the Starbucks prices in various cities around the world to US dollars, and the differences were staggering. A tall (aka "small"—find out why Starbucks has its own names for its drink sizes) latte in New York costs $3.45, which is already higher than the $2.95 national average. In London, on the other hand, you'd pay just $2.84, and you'll get the cheapest drink possible with a $1.53 Starbucks latte in Cairo. (Learn what the healthiest drink on any Starbucks menu is.)

On the other end of the spectrum, don't head to a Starbucks in Switzerland if you're looking to save money. Topping the list as the most expensive Starbucks, a latte in Zurich will cost $5.76—way more than you'd be shelling out at your local US Starbucks. (Find out where you'll find the most expensive McDonald's in the world.)

Of course, a dollar will go further in some countries than in others. Personal finance research firm ValuePenguin looked at Starbucks prices around the world. Analysts converted the cost of a tall latte into US dollars, then adjusted that number to match the relative cost of other goods in the country to account for the usual purchasing power.

Relatively speaking, Americans actually can get the cheapest Starbucks in the world—just $2.75 for a tall latte in January 2016 (though up to $2.95 by the end of 2017). Australians' Starbucks lattes are worth $2.86, Brits' are worth $2.88, and Canadians' and New Zealanders' are worth $3.06, according to ValuePenguin. Not a huge difference, but still something. (Here are 13 more things baristas won't tell you.)

When taking that into account, a Starbucks latte would be quite the luxury. For instance, you'd be paying a pretty penny in India ($7.99), Thailand ($8.04), Vietnam ($8.18), and Indonesia ($8.21).

Those don't even compare to the world's absolute most extravagant Starbucks, though. Stop for a latte in Russia and you're looking to drop the equivalent of $12.32 on your morning pick-me-up. Yikes! We'll skip the Starbucks stop in Russia and stick with tea like most Russians to get more bang from those bucks.

Sign up here to get INSIDER's favorite stories straight to your inbox.


This is the most expensive Starbucks in the world

Any Starbucks addict will admit buying coffee there isn't exactly a cheap stop. If you thought your seasonal drink addiction was putting a dent in your wallet, though, you'll cringe to see the prices at other locations around the world.

The Wall Street Journal converted the Starbucks prices in various cities around the world to US dollars, and the differences were staggering. A tall (aka "small"—find out why Starbucks has its own names for its drink sizes) latte in New York costs $3.45, which is already higher than the $2.95 national average. In London, on the other hand, you'd pay just $2.84, and you'll get the cheapest drink possible with a $1.53 Starbucks latte in Cairo. (Learn what the healthiest drink on any Starbucks menu is.)

On the other end of the spectrum, don't head to a Starbucks in Switzerland if you're looking to save money. Topping the list as the most expensive Starbucks, a latte in Zurich will cost $5.76—way more than you'd be shelling out at your local US Starbucks. (Find out where you'll find the most expensive McDonald's in the world.)

Of course, a dollar will go further in some countries than in others. Personal finance research firm ValuePenguin looked at Starbucks prices around the world. Analysts converted the cost of a tall latte into US dollars, then adjusted that number to match the relative cost of other goods in the country to account for the usual purchasing power.

Relatively speaking, Americans actually can get the cheapest Starbucks in the world—just $2.75 for a tall latte in January 2016 (though up to $2.95 by the end of 2017). Australians' Starbucks lattes are worth $2.86, Brits' are worth $2.88, and Canadians' and New Zealanders' are worth $3.06, according to ValuePenguin. Not a huge difference, but still something. (Here are 13 more things baristas won't tell you.)

When taking that into account, a Starbucks latte would be quite the luxury. For instance, you'd be paying a pretty penny in India ($7.99), Thailand ($8.04), Vietnam ($8.18), and Indonesia ($8.21).

Those don't even compare to the world's absolute most extravagant Starbucks, though. Stop for a latte in Russia and you're looking to drop the equivalent of $12.32 on your morning pick-me-up. Yikes! We'll skip the Starbucks stop in Russia and stick with tea like most Russians to get more bang from those bucks.

Sign up here to get INSIDER's favorite stories straight to your inbox.


This is the most expensive Starbucks in the world

Any Starbucks addict will admit buying coffee there isn't exactly a cheap stop. If you thought your seasonal drink addiction was putting a dent in your wallet, though, you'll cringe to see the prices at other locations around the world.

The Wall Street Journal converted the Starbucks prices in various cities around the world to US dollars, and the differences were staggering. A tall (aka "small"—find out why Starbucks has its own names for its drink sizes) latte in New York costs $3.45, which is already higher than the $2.95 national average. In London, on the other hand, you'd pay just $2.84, and you'll get the cheapest drink possible with a $1.53 Starbucks latte in Cairo. (Learn what the healthiest drink on any Starbucks menu is.)

On the other end of the spectrum, don't head to a Starbucks in Switzerland if you're looking to save money. Topping the list as the most expensive Starbucks, a latte in Zurich will cost $5.76—way more than you'd be shelling out at your local US Starbucks. (Find out where you'll find the most expensive McDonald's in the world.)

Of course, a dollar will go further in some countries than in others. Personal finance research firm ValuePenguin looked at Starbucks prices around the world. Analysts converted the cost of a tall latte into US dollars, then adjusted that number to match the relative cost of other goods in the country to account for the usual purchasing power.

Relatively speaking, Americans actually can get the cheapest Starbucks in the world—just $2.75 for a tall latte in January 2016 (though up to $2.95 by the end of 2017). Australians' Starbucks lattes are worth $2.86, Brits' are worth $2.88, and Canadians' and New Zealanders' are worth $3.06, according to ValuePenguin. Not a huge difference, but still something. (Here are 13 more things baristas won't tell you.)

When taking that into account, a Starbucks latte would be quite the luxury. For instance, you'd be paying a pretty penny in India ($7.99), Thailand ($8.04), Vietnam ($8.18), and Indonesia ($8.21).

Those don't even compare to the world's absolute most extravagant Starbucks, though. Stop for a latte in Russia and you're looking to drop the equivalent of $12.32 on your morning pick-me-up. Yikes! We'll skip the Starbucks stop in Russia and stick with tea like most Russians to get more bang from those bucks.

Sign up here to get INSIDER's favorite stories straight to your inbox.


Watch the video: The Man Behind Starbucks Reveals How He Changed the World


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