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Americans Are Most Excited to Margaritas From Bars Again, According to DoorDash

Americans Are Most Excited to Margaritas From Bars Again, According to DoorDash


The majority of survey respondents said they're excited to order an alcoholic drink when they return to restaurants

CabecaDeMarmore/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Although some restaurants have already reopened after shutting down during the coronavirus pandemic, some diners have not yet returned to a normal restaurant routine. But when the time finally comes to go back to restaurants and bars, there is one drink that Americans say they're most excited to order again: margaritas.

The Best Cocktail Bar in Every State

While it is possible to be your own mixologist during quarantine, there are some drinks that just don't reach restaurant-quality when making them at home. And margaritas seem to be ones of them. According to Doordash, 20% of people said they were most excited to order the tequila-based drink when restaurants and bars reopen.

The data comes from DoorDash, one of the nation's top food delivery services. In order to come up whese numbers, DoorDash used data from Jan. 1 to June 30, 2020 and a national consumer survey. The company's report checked popular food and drink trends and how users ate during social distancing. The national consumer survey polled 2,000 Americans on what foods and drinks they missed the most while restaurants were closed.

According to the data, 59% of respondents said they are excited to order an aloholic drink when they return to restaurants. Margaritas were the No. 1 option, chosen by 20%. The drink was followed by a classic cocktail and beer.

When looking at just beer and margaritas, men were divided. According to the DoorDash data, 17% of men chose beer, while 16% chose a margarita. And only 5% of women selected beer — 24% chose a margarita.

But no matter where you stand, there are plenty of different drinks you can try making at home. And the trends seem to vary by location, from Alabama to Wyoming, these are the most popular coronavirus quarantine cocktails by state.


  • Life expectancy in the US is now three years shorter than it is in 34 of the world's other wealthiest countries, including Canada, the UK and Latvia
  • Americans are more likely to die before age 50 than people in half of those other top nations
  • Recent research revealed that more older Americans are sicker, and lack access to health care than citizens in other countries
  • The newly-passed tax reform is set to widen income gaps and could deprive more Americans of health care

Published: 17:53 BST, 28 December 2017 | Updated: 21:20 BST, 28 December 2017

Life expectancy in the US fell again for the second year in a row in 2016, meaning Americans' lives are about three years shorter than those of people in 34 similarly wealthy countries, according to the latest data.

Not so long ago, the reverse was true: Americans lived to be 73.9 in 1979, while people in the other countries in world's highest wealth bracket, Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), lived to be 72.3 on average.

The flip, recent research suggests, can be traced to the trajectories of changes to healthcare policies in these rich nations.

As other countries expand their social welfare programs to create more equal access, the US offers fewer benefits than any other economically-similar nation and the income inequality gap continues to grow.

Life expectancy continued to increase for most of the decade, until drug overdose deaths began driving it back down last year, a trend that continued in 2016

Earlier this month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) simultaneously released data on 2016 drug overdose deaths and life expectancy, and for good reason: overdose deaths emerged as the clear force driving Amercan lifespans down.

But a look at the broader body of data indicates that drugs - and specifically the opioid epidemic - are far from the only force at work against American public health.

The origin of our low life expectancy can be traced back in time from death, to old age, to death rates at a relatively young age.

The US has the second highest gross domestic product (GDP) in the world following the European Union.

Yet, according to a Commonwealth Fund study published in November, Americans not only have poorer health in old age than those in 10 other wealthy countries, but they neglect to seek medical attention for fear they can't afford it.

More than a third of Americans over 65 have more than one chronic health condition.


  • Life expectancy in the US is now three years shorter than it is in 34 of the world's other wealthiest countries, including Canada, the UK and Latvia
  • Americans are more likely to die before age 50 than people in half of those other top nations
  • Recent research revealed that more older Americans are sicker, and lack access to health care than citizens in other countries
  • The newly-passed tax reform is set to widen income gaps and could deprive more Americans of health care

Published: 17:53 BST, 28 December 2017 | Updated: 21:20 BST, 28 December 2017

Life expectancy in the US fell again for the second year in a row in 2016, meaning Americans' lives are about three years shorter than those of people in 34 similarly wealthy countries, according to the latest data.

Not so long ago, the reverse was true: Americans lived to be 73.9 in 1979, while people in the other countries in world's highest wealth bracket, Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), lived to be 72.3 on average.

The flip, recent research suggests, can be traced to the trajectories of changes to healthcare policies in these rich nations.

As other countries expand their social welfare programs to create more equal access, the US offers fewer benefits than any other economically-similar nation and the income inequality gap continues to grow.

Life expectancy continued to increase for most of the decade, until drug overdose deaths began driving it back down last year, a trend that continued in 2016

Earlier this month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) simultaneously released data on 2016 drug overdose deaths and life expectancy, and for good reason: overdose deaths emerged as the clear force driving Amercan lifespans down.

But a look at the broader body of data indicates that drugs - and specifically the opioid epidemic - are far from the only force at work against American public health.

The origin of our low life expectancy can be traced back in time from death, to old age, to death rates at a relatively young age.

The US has the second highest gross domestic product (GDP) in the world following the European Union.

Yet, according to a Commonwealth Fund study published in November, Americans not only have poorer health in old age than those in 10 other wealthy countries, but they neglect to seek medical attention for fear they can't afford it.

More than a third of Americans over 65 have more than one chronic health condition.


  • Life expectancy in the US is now three years shorter than it is in 34 of the world's other wealthiest countries, including Canada, the UK and Latvia
  • Americans are more likely to die before age 50 than people in half of those other top nations
  • Recent research revealed that more older Americans are sicker, and lack access to health care than citizens in other countries
  • The newly-passed tax reform is set to widen income gaps and could deprive more Americans of health care

Published: 17:53 BST, 28 December 2017 | Updated: 21:20 BST, 28 December 2017

Life expectancy in the US fell again for the second year in a row in 2016, meaning Americans' lives are about three years shorter than those of people in 34 similarly wealthy countries, according to the latest data.

Not so long ago, the reverse was true: Americans lived to be 73.9 in 1979, while people in the other countries in world's highest wealth bracket, Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), lived to be 72.3 on average.

The flip, recent research suggests, can be traced to the trajectories of changes to healthcare policies in these rich nations.

As other countries expand their social welfare programs to create more equal access, the US offers fewer benefits than any other economically-similar nation and the income inequality gap continues to grow.

Life expectancy continued to increase for most of the decade, until drug overdose deaths began driving it back down last year, a trend that continued in 2016

Earlier this month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) simultaneously released data on 2016 drug overdose deaths and life expectancy, and for good reason: overdose deaths emerged as the clear force driving Amercan lifespans down.

But a look at the broader body of data indicates that drugs - and specifically the opioid epidemic - are far from the only force at work against American public health.

The origin of our low life expectancy can be traced back in time from death, to old age, to death rates at a relatively young age.

The US has the second highest gross domestic product (GDP) in the world following the European Union.

Yet, according to a Commonwealth Fund study published in November, Americans not only have poorer health in old age than those in 10 other wealthy countries, but they neglect to seek medical attention for fear they can't afford it.

More than a third of Americans over 65 have more than one chronic health condition.


  • Life expectancy in the US is now three years shorter than it is in 34 of the world's other wealthiest countries, including Canada, the UK and Latvia
  • Americans are more likely to die before age 50 than people in half of those other top nations
  • Recent research revealed that more older Americans are sicker, and lack access to health care than citizens in other countries
  • The newly-passed tax reform is set to widen income gaps and could deprive more Americans of health care

Published: 17:53 BST, 28 December 2017 | Updated: 21:20 BST, 28 December 2017

Life expectancy in the US fell again for the second year in a row in 2016, meaning Americans' lives are about three years shorter than those of people in 34 similarly wealthy countries, according to the latest data.

Not so long ago, the reverse was true: Americans lived to be 73.9 in 1979, while people in the other countries in world's highest wealth bracket, Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), lived to be 72.3 on average.

The flip, recent research suggests, can be traced to the trajectories of changes to healthcare policies in these rich nations.

As other countries expand their social welfare programs to create more equal access, the US offers fewer benefits than any other economically-similar nation and the income inequality gap continues to grow.

Life expectancy continued to increase for most of the decade, until drug overdose deaths began driving it back down last year, a trend that continued in 2016

Earlier this month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) simultaneously released data on 2016 drug overdose deaths and life expectancy, and for good reason: overdose deaths emerged as the clear force driving Amercan lifespans down.

But a look at the broader body of data indicates that drugs - and specifically the opioid epidemic - are far from the only force at work against American public health.

The origin of our low life expectancy can be traced back in time from death, to old age, to death rates at a relatively young age.

The US has the second highest gross domestic product (GDP) in the world following the European Union.

Yet, according to a Commonwealth Fund study published in November, Americans not only have poorer health in old age than those in 10 other wealthy countries, but they neglect to seek medical attention for fear they can't afford it.

More than a third of Americans over 65 have more than one chronic health condition.


  • Life expectancy in the US is now three years shorter than it is in 34 of the world's other wealthiest countries, including Canada, the UK and Latvia
  • Americans are more likely to die before age 50 than people in half of those other top nations
  • Recent research revealed that more older Americans are sicker, and lack access to health care than citizens in other countries
  • The newly-passed tax reform is set to widen income gaps and could deprive more Americans of health care

Published: 17:53 BST, 28 December 2017 | Updated: 21:20 BST, 28 December 2017

Life expectancy in the US fell again for the second year in a row in 2016, meaning Americans' lives are about three years shorter than those of people in 34 similarly wealthy countries, according to the latest data.

Not so long ago, the reverse was true: Americans lived to be 73.9 in 1979, while people in the other countries in world's highest wealth bracket, Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), lived to be 72.3 on average.

The flip, recent research suggests, can be traced to the trajectories of changes to healthcare policies in these rich nations.

As other countries expand their social welfare programs to create more equal access, the US offers fewer benefits than any other economically-similar nation and the income inequality gap continues to grow.

Life expectancy continued to increase for most of the decade, until drug overdose deaths began driving it back down last year, a trend that continued in 2016

Earlier this month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) simultaneously released data on 2016 drug overdose deaths and life expectancy, and for good reason: overdose deaths emerged as the clear force driving Amercan lifespans down.

But a look at the broader body of data indicates that drugs - and specifically the opioid epidemic - are far from the only force at work against American public health.

The origin of our low life expectancy can be traced back in time from death, to old age, to death rates at a relatively young age.

The US has the second highest gross domestic product (GDP) in the world following the European Union.

Yet, according to a Commonwealth Fund study published in November, Americans not only have poorer health in old age than those in 10 other wealthy countries, but they neglect to seek medical attention for fear they can't afford it.

More than a third of Americans over 65 have more than one chronic health condition.


  • Life expectancy in the US is now three years shorter than it is in 34 of the world's other wealthiest countries, including Canada, the UK and Latvia
  • Americans are more likely to die before age 50 than people in half of those other top nations
  • Recent research revealed that more older Americans are sicker, and lack access to health care than citizens in other countries
  • The newly-passed tax reform is set to widen income gaps and could deprive more Americans of health care

Published: 17:53 BST, 28 December 2017 | Updated: 21:20 BST, 28 December 2017

Life expectancy in the US fell again for the second year in a row in 2016, meaning Americans' lives are about three years shorter than those of people in 34 similarly wealthy countries, according to the latest data.

Not so long ago, the reverse was true: Americans lived to be 73.9 in 1979, while people in the other countries in world's highest wealth bracket, Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), lived to be 72.3 on average.

The flip, recent research suggests, can be traced to the trajectories of changes to healthcare policies in these rich nations.

As other countries expand their social welfare programs to create more equal access, the US offers fewer benefits than any other economically-similar nation and the income inequality gap continues to grow.

Life expectancy continued to increase for most of the decade, until drug overdose deaths began driving it back down last year, a trend that continued in 2016

Earlier this month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) simultaneously released data on 2016 drug overdose deaths and life expectancy, and for good reason: overdose deaths emerged as the clear force driving Amercan lifespans down.

But a look at the broader body of data indicates that drugs - and specifically the opioid epidemic - are far from the only force at work against American public health.

The origin of our low life expectancy can be traced back in time from death, to old age, to death rates at a relatively young age.

The US has the second highest gross domestic product (GDP) in the world following the European Union.

Yet, according to a Commonwealth Fund study published in November, Americans not only have poorer health in old age than those in 10 other wealthy countries, but they neglect to seek medical attention for fear they can't afford it.

More than a third of Americans over 65 have more than one chronic health condition.


  • Life expectancy in the US is now three years shorter than it is in 34 of the world's other wealthiest countries, including Canada, the UK and Latvia
  • Americans are more likely to die before age 50 than people in half of those other top nations
  • Recent research revealed that more older Americans are sicker, and lack access to health care than citizens in other countries
  • The newly-passed tax reform is set to widen income gaps and could deprive more Americans of health care

Published: 17:53 BST, 28 December 2017 | Updated: 21:20 BST, 28 December 2017

Life expectancy in the US fell again for the second year in a row in 2016, meaning Americans' lives are about three years shorter than those of people in 34 similarly wealthy countries, according to the latest data.

Not so long ago, the reverse was true: Americans lived to be 73.9 in 1979, while people in the other countries in world's highest wealth bracket, Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), lived to be 72.3 on average.

The flip, recent research suggests, can be traced to the trajectories of changes to healthcare policies in these rich nations.

As other countries expand their social welfare programs to create more equal access, the US offers fewer benefits than any other economically-similar nation and the income inequality gap continues to grow.

Life expectancy continued to increase for most of the decade, until drug overdose deaths began driving it back down last year, a trend that continued in 2016

Earlier this month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) simultaneously released data on 2016 drug overdose deaths and life expectancy, and for good reason: overdose deaths emerged as the clear force driving Amercan lifespans down.

But a look at the broader body of data indicates that drugs - and specifically the opioid epidemic - are far from the only force at work against American public health.

The origin of our low life expectancy can be traced back in time from death, to old age, to death rates at a relatively young age.

The US has the second highest gross domestic product (GDP) in the world following the European Union.

Yet, according to a Commonwealth Fund study published in November, Americans not only have poorer health in old age than those in 10 other wealthy countries, but they neglect to seek medical attention for fear they can't afford it.

More than a third of Americans over 65 have more than one chronic health condition.


  • Life expectancy in the US is now three years shorter than it is in 34 of the world's other wealthiest countries, including Canada, the UK and Latvia
  • Americans are more likely to die before age 50 than people in half of those other top nations
  • Recent research revealed that more older Americans are sicker, and lack access to health care than citizens in other countries
  • The newly-passed tax reform is set to widen income gaps and could deprive more Americans of health care

Published: 17:53 BST, 28 December 2017 | Updated: 21:20 BST, 28 December 2017

Life expectancy in the US fell again for the second year in a row in 2016, meaning Americans' lives are about three years shorter than those of people in 34 similarly wealthy countries, according to the latest data.

Not so long ago, the reverse was true: Americans lived to be 73.9 in 1979, while people in the other countries in world's highest wealth bracket, Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), lived to be 72.3 on average.

The flip, recent research suggests, can be traced to the trajectories of changes to healthcare policies in these rich nations.

As other countries expand their social welfare programs to create more equal access, the US offers fewer benefits than any other economically-similar nation and the income inequality gap continues to grow.

Life expectancy continued to increase for most of the decade, until drug overdose deaths began driving it back down last year, a trend that continued in 2016

Earlier this month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) simultaneously released data on 2016 drug overdose deaths and life expectancy, and for good reason: overdose deaths emerged as the clear force driving Amercan lifespans down.

But a look at the broader body of data indicates that drugs - and specifically the opioid epidemic - are far from the only force at work against American public health.

The origin of our low life expectancy can be traced back in time from death, to old age, to death rates at a relatively young age.

The US has the second highest gross domestic product (GDP) in the world following the European Union.

Yet, according to a Commonwealth Fund study published in November, Americans not only have poorer health in old age than those in 10 other wealthy countries, but they neglect to seek medical attention for fear they can't afford it.

More than a third of Americans over 65 have more than one chronic health condition.


  • Life expectancy in the US is now three years shorter than it is in 34 of the world's other wealthiest countries, including Canada, the UK and Latvia
  • Americans are more likely to die before age 50 than people in half of those other top nations
  • Recent research revealed that more older Americans are sicker, and lack access to health care than citizens in other countries
  • The newly-passed tax reform is set to widen income gaps and could deprive more Americans of health care

Published: 17:53 BST, 28 December 2017 | Updated: 21:20 BST, 28 December 2017

Life expectancy in the US fell again for the second year in a row in 2016, meaning Americans' lives are about three years shorter than those of people in 34 similarly wealthy countries, according to the latest data.

Not so long ago, the reverse was true: Americans lived to be 73.9 in 1979, while people in the other countries in world's highest wealth bracket, Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), lived to be 72.3 on average.

The flip, recent research suggests, can be traced to the trajectories of changes to healthcare policies in these rich nations.

As other countries expand their social welfare programs to create more equal access, the US offers fewer benefits than any other economically-similar nation and the income inequality gap continues to grow.

Life expectancy continued to increase for most of the decade, until drug overdose deaths began driving it back down last year, a trend that continued in 2016

Earlier this month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) simultaneously released data on 2016 drug overdose deaths and life expectancy, and for good reason: overdose deaths emerged as the clear force driving Amercan lifespans down.

But a look at the broader body of data indicates that drugs - and specifically the opioid epidemic - are far from the only force at work against American public health.

The origin of our low life expectancy can be traced back in time from death, to old age, to death rates at a relatively young age.

The US has the second highest gross domestic product (GDP) in the world following the European Union.

Yet, according to a Commonwealth Fund study published in November, Americans not only have poorer health in old age than those in 10 other wealthy countries, but they neglect to seek medical attention for fear they can't afford it.

More than a third of Americans over 65 have more than one chronic health condition.


  • Life expectancy in the US is now three years shorter than it is in 34 of the world's other wealthiest countries, including Canada, the UK and Latvia
  • Americans are more likely to die before age 50 than people in half of those other top nations
  • Recent research revealed that more older Americans are sicker, and lack access to health care than citizens in other countries
  • The newly-passed tax reform is set to widen income gaps and could deprive more Americans of health care

Published: 17:53 BST, 28 December 2017 | Updated: 21:20 BST, 28 December 2017

Life expectancy in the US fell again for the second year in a row in 2016, meaning Americans' lives are about three years shorter than those of people in 34 similarly wealthy countries, according to the latest data.

Not so long ago, the reverse was true: Americans lived to be 73.9 in 1979, while people in the other countries in world's highest wealth bracket, Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), lived to be 72.3 on average.

The flip, recent research suggests, can be traced to the trajectories of changes to healthcare policies in these rich nations.

As other countries expand their social welfare programs to create more equal access, the US offers fewer benefits than any other economically-similar nation and the income inequality gap continues to grow.

Life expectancy continued to increase for most of the decade, until drug overdose deaths began driving it back down last year, a trend that continued in 2016

Earlier this month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) simultaneously released data on 2016 drug overdose deaths and life expectancy, and for good reason: overdose deaths emerged as the clear force driving Amercan lifespans down.

But a look at the broader body of data indicates that drugs - and specifically the opioid epidemic - are far from the only force at work against American public health.

The origin of our low life expectancy can be traced back in time from death, to old age, to death rates at a relatively young age.

The US has the second highest gross domestic product (GDP) in the world following the European Union.

Yet, according to a Commonwealth Fund study published in November, Americans not only have poorer health in old age than those in 10 other wealthy countries, but they neglect to seek medical attention for fear they can't afford it.

More than a third of Americans over 65 have more than one chronic health condition.