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Welsh Cakes recipe

Welsh Cakes recipe


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  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Pancakes

Traditional Welsh pancakes. These make a lovely afternoon treat for children coming home from school! I think you get the best results if you use an electric griddle.

16 people made this

IngredientsServes: 10

  • 300g (10 oz) plain flour
  • 1 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 120g (4 oz) sugar
  • 1/4 tsp nutmeg (or allspice)
  • 1/8 tsp salt
  • 170g (6 oz) butter
  • 100g sultanas
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 60ml milk

MethodPrep:15min ›Cook:10min ›Ready in:25min

  1. In large bowl, sift flour, baking powder, sugar, nutmeg & salt. Mix well.
  2. Cut in butter & blend into dry ingredients until the mixture appears like coarse breadcrumbs. Add sultanas, beaten eggs & milk; mix into soft dough.
  3. Turn out onto lightly floured surface, roll out gently (will be a soft dough) to about 1/2cm thick. Cut out pancakes using a 6cm cutter.
  4. Preheat electric griddle pan to 180 degrees C or heat a heavy non-stick frying pan to medium heat.
  5. Lightly grease griddle or pan with a knob of butter.
  6. Place cakes on griddle and allow to cook for 2 -3 minutes or until golden. Flip over to cook the other side.
  7. You can add a sprinkle of sugar at this point, if desired. Place on plate to cool and serve warm.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(7)

Reviews in English (9)

Used different ingredients.Made the recipe Gluten Free by:Using Dove's Farm Gluten Free Plain Flour with 2 tsp gluten free baking powder-05 Mar 2009

These aren't proper Welsh Cakes! Welsh Cakes use a traditional recipe containing a mix of lard and butter, mixed spice, mixed fruit (raisins, currants, sultanas), flour. baking powder and sugar. They should NOT be cooked on an electric griddle! They should be cooked in the traditional way on a proper baking stone. If you don't have that then a heavy based pan or griddle would be preferable.-22 Feb 2012

I made this for my family and they all liked it though I had to let them cook for a while to insure they were cooked all the way through. I'm not sure we have the same version of sultanas here in Alaska as is used in the UK so I used raisins.The nutmeg made these extra tasty and I added some cinnamon. Placing these in freezer bags allowed these to be reheated in the toaster through out the week for a quick snack.-05 Oct 2008


Welsh Cakes

  • Quick Glance
  • (3)
  • 50 M
  • 50 M
  • Makes about 1 dozen cakes

Ingredients

  • 1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1/2 cup (4 ounces) chilled unsalted butter, cut into 8 pieces
  • 1/3 cup sultanas or golden raisins
  • 1/3 cup dried currants
  • 1 large egg, well beaten

Directions

In the bowl of a food processor fitted with a metal blade, pulse the flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt until thoroughly blended. Add the butter pieces, and process until powdery, about 15 to 20 one-second pulses.

Dump the mixture into a large bowl, add the dried fruits and the egg, and mix with a fork to form a firm dough. (If it appears dry, work it with your hands until it comes together.) Turn the dough out onto a clean surface, and knead it several times.

Lightly flour the surface and roll out the dough to a thickness of 1/2 an inch. Using a 2 1/2-inch cookie cutter, cut out the disks, pressing firmly to cleanly cut through the dried fruits. Gather any leftover dough, knead briefly, reroll, and repeat.

Heat a lightly buttered cast-iron frying pan or griddle over medium heat. Place 3 or 4 cakes in the pan and cook for 4 to 5 minutes, adjusting the heat and repositioning the cakes until they’re an even pancake-brown. Flip and cook another 3 to 4 minutes. Continue until all the cakes are cooked. Let cool completely before serving. The cakes will keep for a week wrapped in plastic in a cookie tin.

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Comments

I’m having a traditional English afternoon tea party for 8-10 guests. In addition to cucumber sandwiches and cake, one usually serves scones. I decided to do Welsh cakes instead of scones. Do I have to make them in single batches, or can iI double or triple the recipe?

Hi Judith, because baking recipes rely on the perfect balance of leavening agents, it is always safest to not double or triple a recipe. Another lovely recipe that you might want to add to your English tea is this Victoria Sponge Cake.

I have a question, I recently came across a post for something called: Welsh Tea Bread. Do you have any recipes to share. I’d love to try one, or two, or three… :) Thanks.

Cheryl, I don’t but I did find this recipe.

Ok, an update on my rating and comments on this recipe.

On Thursday, Jan. 21, 2016, I made 4 more batches of this recipe, for my husband to take to work. I decided to experiment a bit just for fun and try different types of dried fruits. Here’s what I did, and they all were great.

(1) I did an original batch.
(2) I did a batch using Dried Cranberries with White Chocolate Chips.
(3) I did a batch using 2 different types of raisins.
(4) I did a batch using Chocolate Nibs with Pecans. (This tasted really good, but, it really needed more Chocolate Nibs than what I had on hand. Don’t be shy to try this, but I would recommend using about 3/4 cup of Chocolate Nibs and 3/4 cup of Chopped Pecans, for these to taste awesome). (I had about an 1/8 of a cup of Chocolate Nibs on hand)

So, there you have it. This recipe is very versatile and everyone at my husband’s work loved them. Said they were much better than anything they ever had from Starbucks. And since they do breakfast biscuits and fruits on Friday mornings, I won’t be surprised if these end up being a regular requested item. And my hubby passed the recipe out to a few people who wanted it. :) Love this recipe.

Cheryl, thanks for this. You are one of my great ambassadors!

LOL…my husband and grandson are hooked on these things. I made them twice on Thursday and again yesterday, Friday and it seems I’ll be making them again later today. :) Oh, and I shared the recipe with a friend of mine who is from Germany. She’d never heard of them. These are just so easy and incredible. I’m surprised others haven’t tried them and posted about them. Again, thanks so very much for the recipe.

Wonderful, Cheryl. And perhaps you friend can leave a comment, and we can convert the world!

So, yesterday I came across this recipe. I decided to give it a try. I’d never heard of them and I’d never bought, or used, currants before, even though I’ve seen them in the store. So, off I went to buy some, along with eggs, since I was out. I came home, mixed up the dough, not sure what to expect. Pulled out my griddle, heated it up and commenced to cook them.

When they were done, and still hot, I sprinkled them with Dr. Oetker Natural Vanilla Sugar. (purchased the sugar at the German Store/bakery we have in a town about 45 minutes from us) Then, once cooled, I ate one. I thought, ok…this is different. Wasn’t sure what to think of them. After a bit, I ate a second one. Thought to myself, wow, these are actually pretty good. And then I ate a 3rd one and decided that was probably enough.

So, about 2 hours later, my husband comes home and he has our 11-year-old grandson with him. They each tried one, really liked them and then ate what was left. (Oh, the recipe made 16 of these little cakes) Anyway, they ate what was left. Then they wanted me to make more, so they could have some for today. My husband wanted them to go with his coffee and our grandson wanted some in his lunch.

So, I made a 2nd batch last night. Right now, there’s only 3 left and I won’t be surprised if my husband ask me to make more tonight. So, my opinion.

These are really, really good, worth trying and worth making. Now, I will say, our grandson is not your typical kid. He has no qualms about trying new foods and he’s finding his palate. He suggested I put some lemon zest in some. Which I did last night. Some were original and some had lemon zest. Those were good too. He had one of each in his lunch today.

So, yes, I highly recommend trying these.

And for my American counterparts who need a reference guide of what they’re like…. They’re a cross between a biscuit, a scone and cookie. Only better. Happy baking and thanks so much for sharing the recipe.


Here's what to use in place of mixed spice

To make your own mixed spice, you can combine the following: 3 parts each ground cinnamon and ground nutmeg, 2 parts ground mace, and 1 part each ground cloves, ground coriander, ground ginger, and ground allspice.

If you don't want to go through all that bother or perhaps you're not entirely sure where to find mace, coriander, or allspice (much less what to do with the rest of the jar), you can also replace the mixed spice with an equal amount of pumpkin pie spice! Sure, this somewhat simpler blend of cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, and allspice isn't exactly the same thing, but it has a similar enough flavor profile that you probably won't notice the difference even if you have tried authentic British mixed spice.


  1. Combine the flour, sugar, baking powder and mixed spice in a bowl and rub in the fat until it resembles bread crumbs.
  2. Stir in the sultanas.
  3. Beat the egg and stir it into the dry mix until it forms a rollable dough, like pastry. If it is too dry add a tablespoon of milk.
  4. Roll out on a lightly floured board until it&rsquos about twice the thickness of pastry. Cut into rounds.
  5. Melt a knob of butter or lard in a frying pan and fry the Welsh Cakes on a medium heat for a few minutes on either side until golden brown and cooked through.
  6. Serve hot or cold with butter or sugar.

I believe traditional Welsh Cake recipes use currants rather than sultanas but I opted for sultanas because that&rsquos what I had in my cupboard and because my little ones prefer their softer texture.

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The answer is simple, Simplicity, Foolproof, Straightforward, and Tested. Yes, all recipes have been tested before posting including this Welsh Cakes.

Ready to make this Welsh Cakes Recipe? Let’s do it!

Oh, before I forget…If you’re looking for recipes that are simple to follow, then we’ve got your back. With over 55,000 recipes in our database, we’ve got the best recipes you’re craving for.

1/2 lb Flour 1 t Mixed spice
1/2 lb Flour, self-raising -(see note)
4 oz Butter 1 t Nutmeg, ground
4 oz Lard 1 lg Egg
3 oz Currants Milk, to mix
3/4 C Sugar

Sieve flour and spices into a mixing bowl. Add fat and mix to crumbs like
pastry. Stir in remaining dry ingredients.

Break up the egg in a separate bowl. Add broken egg to dry ingredients,
mix well until it starts to form a lump. If it is s not sticking together,
add a little milk (it should be moister than pastry but should not be
soggy)

Roll out on a floured board to about 1/4 to 1/2 inch thick. Cut into
rounds using a biscuit cutter.

Heat “pan” (see above) grease “pan” and when fat has melted wipe off with
absorbent paper. This leaves a residue of fat, the cakes actually cook in
their own fat. The “pan” is hot enough when you can hold your hand just
above it for about a minute.

Place some cakes on “pan” and wait till they turn a speckled golden brown
colour. Turn them over and repeat on the other side. They are better
cooked quite slowly about 3-5 minutes each cake.

* Traditional Welsh biscuity cakes — This is a very old traditional Welsh
recipe from my boyfriend’s family. It was passed on to his mother from his
grandmother, whose family ran the village bakery in Ammanford, near
Swansea, Wales. The family name is Morgan, of course. They claim to be
related to Captain Morgan, the pirate.

The Welsh for welsh cakes is teisen lap (tea ‘ion lap) which means “plate
cake.” It is traditionally cooked on a “maern” (pronounced marn), which is
a about half-inch thick piece of cast iron placed on the fire or cooker. A
heavy frying pan or griddle will do. Yield: Makes 40-50.

* Mixed spice is a mix of ground spices that is available premixed here in
England. It is typically 60 percent coriander, 30 percent cinnamon, 5
percent nutmeg, with small traces of ginger and clove. Sometimes it has
10-15 percent caraway or 10 percent cassia (Saigon cinnamon) mixed in.
Since almost all “cinnamon” sold in North America is really cassia, and
cassia has a stronger flavor than true cinnamon, a North American formula
for mixed spice would be 70 percent coriander, 15 percent cinnamon, 5
percent nutmeg, and 10 percent caraway.

* Welsh cakes are great eaten hot or cold, with or without butter, though
I never use butter myself. I usually make a double batch because they don’t
keep. But to store them, allow to go cold and place in an airtight box.
They will keep for up to a week.

* I often add a little more of the spices to give them more of a kick.

: Difficulty: easy.
: Time: 5 minutes preparation, 20 minutes cooking.
: Precision: Measure all ingredients.

: Tina Coulson
: STC Telecommunications Ltd, New Southgate, London.
: [email protected]
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:
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: and slow in the fast lane of the M1 ]


Welsh Cookies (aka Welsh Cakes) Recipe

My grandmother always made these with a scalloped cookie cutter. I'm not sure what the significance of that cookie cutter was, but I think someone in the family made it. She only used it for Welsh cookies though.

When she passed, everyone wanted that cookie cutter. I didn't get it, but I did find one similar. Mine has smaller scallops, so they don't turn out quite the same. But they taste the same, and that's all that matters.

More dessert recipes I'm sure you'll love:

What is the Best Way to Eat a Welsh Cake (Cookie)?

They are delicious warm or room temperature. I had plenty of them still partially frozen from the deep freeze, but I will admit that they are better warm.

If you do want to reheat them, it's best to heat them in a pan on the stove rather than microwave them. You can also heat them at 275 degrees Fahrenheit for three to four minutes.

You can dip them in sugar like I do or leave them plain and eat them with jam or butter.

Why Are They Called Welsh Cakes (Cookies)?

They were traditionally made on a cast iron griddle over an open fire. I use an electric skillet to make mine, and I've also made them in a pan on the stove.

How Long Do Welsh Cakes (Cookies) Last?

Welsh cakes will last about a week in an airtight container. You can also freeze them. They freeze beautifully and don't get soft when they thaw.

What are Currants?

You really do need to use currants for this recipe. You might be tempted to add raisins, but they will not taste the same.

Currants do come from grapes, specifically the Black Corinth grape. They are dried and give a sweet and flavorful dried fruit.

They are sometimes called Zante currants because the grapes were grown on the island of Zante south of Greece.


Traditional Welsh Food

What is traditional Welsh food?

Traditional Welsh food recipes have been handed down one generation to another with written recipes rare and when written tended to be ‘anglicised’. As a consequence Traditional Welsh food could easily be called regional Welsh food as the same type of dish was slightly different one side of the mountain to the other or one valley to another.

Welsh cookery is said to originate from the daily meals of village folk rather than the kitchens of the gentry. This is so easily demonstrated in the traditional Welsh foods of Welsh Cawl and Welsh Rarebit.

Because of the historical Welsh way of life food was either cooked in a cauldron or on a bakestone and this has in many ways brought forward into more modern ways of traditional welsh food.

There was much unrest in Wales around food in the 18 th and early 19 th centuries which was only brought to an end by the industrial revolution at the end of the 19 th century.

At this time not only did Wales have the influence of the Italian immigrants which is still around today. As a consequence most traditional Welsh foods are recorded from around this time such as Welsh Cakes, Bara Brith, Glamorgan Sausages, Welsh Rarebit.

Here you’ll find info and recipes for a variety of traditional Welsh food. Some of the recipes will have a slightly modern twist on the traditional but taste every bit as good as the original recipe.


Welsh Cakes recipe - Recipes

RELATED RECIPE COLLECTIONS

Mixed spice is available premixed and typically contains 60% coriander, 30% cinnamon, 5% nutmeg, with small traces of ginger and clove. Sometimes it has 10-15% caraway or 10% cassia (Saigon cinnamon) mixed in. Since almost all "cinnamon" sold in North America is really cassia, and cassia has a stronger flavor than true cinnamon, a North American formula for mixed spice would be 70% coriander, 15% cinnamon, 5% nutmeg, and 10% caraway.

Welsh cakes are great eaten hot or cold, with or without butter, though I never use butter myself. I usually make a double batch because they don't keep. But to store them, allow to go cold and place in an airtight box. They will keep for up to a week. I often add a little more of the spices to give them more of a kick.

Break up the egg in a separate bowl. Add broken egg to dry ingredients, mixing well until it starts to form a lump.

If it is not sticking together, add a little milk (it should be more moist than pie crust dough but should not be soggy).

Roll out on a floured board to about 1/4 to 1/2 inch (1/2 to 1 cm) thick. Cut into rounds using a biscuit cutter.

Heat and grease a heavy cast iron frying pan and when the fat has melted, wipe off with a paper towel. This leaves a residue of fat the cakes actually cook in their own fat. The pan is hot enough when you can hold your hand just above it for about a minute.

Place some cakes on the surface of the pan and wait until they turn a speckled golden brown colour.

Turn them over and repeat on the other side. They are better cooked quite slowly (about 3-5 minutes each cake).


  • 6 oz plain flour with 3 teaspoons baking powder added (or use self raising flour)
  • 2 oz margarine, butter or dripping
  • 2 oz sultanas (or mixed dried fruit)
  • 1 small carrot grated
  • 2 oz sugar
  • 1 fresh egg or 1 dried reconstituted egg
  • 1 tablespoon milk
  • 1/4 teaspoon of ground nutmeg
  1. Rub fat into the flour and baking powder mix until resembles bread crumbs
  2. Stir in nutmeg, sugar and dried fruit
  3. Mix the egg and milk together and add to dry mix to form a stiff dough (add more liquid or more flour as needed)
  4. Treat mixture as pastry and roll out on floured surface to 1/4 inch thick
  5. Use 3 inch rounds to cut out
  6. Pre-heat griddle or heavy frying pan
  7. Grease
  8. Put in Welsh Cakes and cook until golden brown on both sides over a moderate heat (about 4 minutes)
  9. Set aside a cool
  10. Sprinkle with a little sugar
  11. Serve with butter/jam and a nice cuppa strong tea!

PS: If you are interested in reading the blog from the beginning- be sure to check out the blog archive all set out in order from beginning to end- makes things easy! CLICK HERE

“This post is part of Twinkl’s VE Day Campaign, and is featured in their Best Wartime Recipes to Celebrate VE Day from Home post”


What Makes This Welsh Cakes (bakestone Recipes) Recipe Better?

The answer is simple, Simplicity, Foolproof, Straightforward, and Tested. Yes, all recipes have been tested before posting including this Welsh Cakes (bakestone Recipes).

Ready to make this Welsh Cakes (bakestone Recipes) Recipe? Let’s do it!

Oh, before I forget…If you’re looking for recipes that are simple to follow, then we’ve got your back. With over 55,000 recipes in our database, we’ve got the best recipes you’re craving for.

8 oz Plain flour 3 oz Granulated sugar
1 ts Baking powder 2 oz Raisins (or currants)
1/4 ts Mized spice 1 Egg, beaten
2 oz Butter or margarine 3 tb Milk
2 oz Lard

Sift the flour, baking powder and spice into a mizing bowl. Cut the
fat into the flour, and rub it to a breadcrumb-like consistency
then mix in the sugar and raisins. Mix in the egg, and sufficient
milk to make a stiff dough. Roll out on a floured board to 1/4 inch
thick. Cut into 3 inch rounds. Bake on a hot greased bakestone
until golden brown, about 4 minutes on each side.
*
Variation: “Teisen Dinca” — Make up the Welsh Cake dough adding 6 oz
peeled and grated cooking apples before adding the egg. Mix to a
stiff dough, adding milk if necessary. Roll out, cut into rounds and
cook on the bakestone as for Welsh Cakes. Serve hot with butter,
golden syrup, or honey.

Yields
4 servings



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TRADITIONAL WELSH BISCUIT CAKES