New recipes

America’s 75 Best Tacos for 2015

America’s 75 Best Tacos for 2015


This is 2015's ranking. For 2016's ranking, please click here.

The taco inspires fierce passion and loyalty throughout the United States. Ask a resident of Texas (Austin and Houston in particular) where the country’s best tacos are, and they’ll say you’re certain to find them in their city, full of pulled and smoked meat. Head to San Diego and you’re sure to meet some people who are absolutely convinced that there’s nothing better than the fried fish tacos that are ubiquitous there. Elsewhere, purists say there's nothing like a carnitas taco, or a taco al pastor.

America’s 75 Best Tacos (Slideshow)

And you know what? They're all right. New Yorkers have complained for years that it’s tough to find a great taco in their city, but in recent times, several have been introduced that rival the best you’ll find in Mexico. And, up in Chicago, a town that has never exactly been a taco paradise, Maxwell Street Market has arguably become a world-class taco destination.

What makes a great taco, exactly? The best ones tend to be simple, with clean, vibrant, and varied flavors, each component good enough to stand on its own. A perfect taco is balanced in flavor, and isn’t loaded down by superfluous add-ons. The tortilla (traditionally corn in Mexico, but often flour around the U.S. today) should be super fresh and, ideally, handmade where it will be served. The filling should be made with an eye for balance in taste and moisture level. The toppings, be they traditional onions and cilantro or new-wave chipotle harissa, should brighten, heighten, and tie the whole taco together into a cohesive, delicious dish.

We’ve tackled the task of ranking the country’s best twice before, and this time we looked to our readers to help us identify more of the best. We put out a call to action, asking them to comment on our site or our social media pages, or to email us with their nominations for the best tacos in the country. Additionally, we asked our knowledgeable Daily Meal staff and City Editors to weigh in with their picks. We gathered these nominees together and added them to all the tacos that were considered last year.

In the end, we had a list of about 330 tacos, which we then compiled into a survey and sent to our distinguished panel of taco experts — food and restaurant personalities who know a superior taco when they taste one. They voted, we tallied the results, and then put together America’s 75 Best Tacos for you, our readers, to enjoy:

75) Torres Taco Haven, San Antonio: Ralphie's Special


Owned and operated by the Jerry Torres family, the two locations of Torres Taco Haven in San Antonio are regarded as great places to get authentic Mexican food made by the locals. The Ralphie Special is a crowd favorite: it’s made up of three tacos filled with marinated chicken, topped with grated cabbage and sliced tomato and garnished with lemon.

74) FUEL Charleston, Charleston, S.C.: Braised Pork


FUEL Charleston offers Caribbean-influenced food with a menu that boasts house-ground burgers, jerk chicken, a bevy of salads, and — you guessed it — tacos. Their braised pork taco comes with green chile aïoli, green slaw, and sweet onion relish, and was one of Guy Fieri’s top picks when he visited FUEL on Diners, Drive-ins, and Dives.

75. Torres Taco Haven, San Antonio: Ralphie's Special

74. FUEL Charleston, Charleston, S.C.: Braised Pork

73. Rubi's At Maxwell Street Market, Chicago: Huitlacoche

72. Border Grill, Las Vegas: Crispy Potato Rajas

71. Carnitas Uruapan, Chicago: Carnitas

70. Taqueria Del Sol, Atlanta: Smoked Brisket

69. Gonzalez, Dallas: Crispy Beef Tacos with Salsa Fresca

68. Fat Fish, San Diego: Fish

67. Loteria Grill, Los Angeles: Carne Deshebrada

66. Essex, Seattle: Fish

65. Good 2 Go Taco, Dallas: Paris Texas

64. Tacos Mex y Mariscos, Albequerque: Al Pastor

63. Pinches Tacos, Los Angeles: Carne Asada

62. Reyes Deli and Grocery, Brooklyn, N.Y.: Carnitas

61. Cacao Mexicatessen, Los Angeles: Fish

60. Bear Flag Fish Co., Newport Beach, Calif.: Basa

59. Las Cuatro Milpas, San Diego: Shredded Pork

58. Ramona's, Gardena, Calif.: Ground Beef and Potato Taco

57. Basico, Charleston, S.C.: Fried Chicken with Watermelon Rind

56. Habanero Mexican Cafe, Austin: Barbacoa

55. Los Cinco Puntos, Los Angeles: Carnitas

54. Taqueria Vallarta, San Francisco: Al Pastor

53. Tacos Morelos, New York City: Chorizo

52. El Vez, Philadelphia: Grilled Shrimp Tacos al Carbon

51. La Ranchera, Abilene, Texas: Lengua

50. Downtown Bakery, New York City: Chicken Mole

49. La Lagartija Taqueria, Chicago: Shrimp

48. La Nueva Fresh & Hot Tortilleria, Dallas: Guisado Verde

47. Taco Boy, Charleston, S.C.: Carnitas Norteno

46. Papalote Taco House, Austin, Texas: Cecina Taco

45. Guisados, Los Angeles: Cochinita Pibil

44. Laredo Taqueria, Houston: Pork in Red Sauce

43. Mariscos El Pulpo, San Diego: Pulpo Ajillo

42. Empellón Taqueria, New York City: Beer-Braised Pork Tongue

41. El Rey Del Taco, Atlanta: Cabeza

40. Seviche, Louisville, Ky.: Mahi Mahi

39. El Charrito, Riverside, Conn.: Carnitas Taco

38. Ines Bakery, Brooklyn, N.Y.: Tinga

37. Tacolicious, San Francisco: Bistec Adobado

36. Joe's Bakery, Austin, Texas: Carne Guisada Taco

35. New York Bakery, New York City: Fish

34. Taco Taco Café, San Antonio: Puffy Taco with Picadillo

33. Pinche Taquería, Denver, Co.: Pork Belly “‘Agridulce

32. Bob's Taco Station, Rosenberg, Texas: Barbacoa Taco

31. Supermercado Chicago, Atlanta: Carne Asada Taco

30. Frontera GrilFrontera Grill, Chicago: Arabes

29. Tehuitzingo, New York City: Suadero

28. El Parasol, Santa Fe, N.M.: Shredded Beef Taco

27. Big Star, Chicago: Spit-Roasted Pork

26. Hugo's Tacos, Los Angeles: Carnitas

25. Dora's Deli, Walla Walla, Wash.: Vegetable Taco

24. Ray's Drive Inn, San Antonio: Carne Guisada Puffy Taco

23. Mary and Tito's Café, Albuquerque, N.M.: Carne Adovada Taco

22. La Condesa, Austin, Texas: Arábicos Taco

21. Matt's Famous El Rancho, Austin, Texas: Al Carbón Taco

20. Los Tacos No. 1, New York City: Adobada

19. ABC Cocina, New York City: Short Rib

18. Tacomiendo, Los Angeles: Potato Taco

17. Chico's, El Paso, Texas: Chico's Taco

16. Kogi, Los Angeles: Korean Short-Rib

15. Henry's Puffy Tacos, San Antonio: Puffy Taco

14. Tortilleria Nixtamal, Queens, N.Y.: Carnitas Taco

13. Mi Tierra, San Antonio: Carnitas Michoacan

12. La Super-Rica, Santa Barbara, Calif.: Tri-Tip

11. Tacos la Vaquita, Durham, N.C.: Barbacoa

10. Mexicali Taco & Co., Los Angeles: Chorizo

9. Birrieria Zaragoza, Chicago: Birria Tatemada Taco

8. Tito's Tacos, Culver City, Calif.: Tito's Taco with Cheese

7. Mariscos German, San Diego: Fish

6. El Real Tex-Mex Café, Houston: Chicken Puffy Taco

5. Torchy’s Tacos, Various Texas Locations: Trailer Park Taco

4. The Shed, Santa Fe, N.M.: Chicken with Green Chile

3. La Paz, Maxwell Street Market, Chicago: "Quesadilla"

2. La Taquería, San Francisco: Carnitas

1. Tacodeli, Austin: El Conquistador


America’s 75 Best Tacos for 2015 - Recipes

It is important to remember that though tacos are of Mexican origin, there is not an archetypal kind of Mexican taco. Mexican people incorporate the recipes and cooking styles of indigenous and European people into their own. According to Tacopedia, an informative tome written by Déborah Holtz and Juan Carlos Mena, the taco is the focal point of Mexican cuisine. The taco, simply described as a tortilla wrapped around food, is known worldwide for its Mexican roots, and known in Mexico as part of the Mexican culture.

The phrase, “echarse un taco,” to grab a taco, has become so prevalent in Mexico that it is now synonymous with getting any kind of food. Many Mexican sayings incorporate tacos as well, including but not limited to, “Le echas mucha crema a tus tacos,” which means you add a lot of sour cream to your tacos, and describes someone who thinks very, possibly too, highly of himself or herself. Though this is certainly interesting, it is not the only way tacos have been integrated into Mexico’s general culture.

The process of nixtamal is also well-known in Mexico and used to create the tortilla- the soft outer shell of the taco that holds all the ingredients. Maize is boiled in diluted quicklime, and the kernels are left out over night. This allows the mixture of cornmeal and maize flour to become malleable and cohesive. This process dates back to 1,000 and 500 B.C. when the taco was “created” as an edible spoon. Due to its ability to hold a number of foods, Holtz and Mena note that there are many variations of the taco, and they are all ubiquitous in Mexico.

The hard taco shell was created so that Mexican food could travel beyond Mexican culture. The traditional tortilla does not last very long sitting out for twenty-four hours can leave the tortilla stale. The hard shell, however, is fried, wrapped in plastic, and can sit until it needs to be used. This is helpful when goods are being transported out of Mexican communities and spread all over the world.

Even with the many different versions produced by the Mexican people, Tacos still continue to be redesigned all over the world. For example, if one were to ask for tacos in California, he or she may be served smoked marlin tacos: marlin wrapped in a tortilla with cilantro, cabbage, tomatoes, and red onion. If this same question was asked in Sweden, it is likely one will get a Gringa Taco: corn tortilla filled with cheese and seasoned beef, served with salsa, cilantro, and onion. Due to their presence worldwide, tacos have become a defining aspect of Mexican culture.

As you can see, the taco is a strong part of Mexican culture. Its variance makes it even more popular worldwide, and Mexico can take pride in the fact that they have an international presence. This is evident because of the many chain restaurants that were created to serve Mexican food. Just a few examples are Taco Bell, Chipotle, Blue Burrito, and California Tortilla, and interestingly enough, these all exist either on campus or downtown.

3 Comments on The Culture of the Taco

Mgc5166

I remember the first time I realized the versatility of the mighty taco. It was at a birthday party, and up until then, the tacos my mother made were always the same consistent recipe. It blew my toddler mind that a taco could have chicken or pork instead of beef. And reading this makes me feel the epiphany all over again. I also think it’s hilarious that saying someone adds too much sour cream to their tacos is a slight at someone’s lofty ego, and I had no idea that the tortilla was such an old concept. I’m feeling tacos tonight.

Kvl5406

I never thought of a taco as an edible spoon but this realization is kind of mind blowing because that’s really exactly what it is! I will probably never get over that, honestly. I think it’s super interesting that saying “grab a taco” could mean getting any type of food now. It reminds me of how there are some places that call all soda Coke. It’s interesting to see how food and culture are intertwined and how it can even influence language!

Aft5105

Mmmm I may just head to Chipotle after reading this! The history of the taco is quite interesting. That’s amazing that the hard shelled taco can last until ready to be eaten. I have always wondered about the story behind the different types of taco shells. It seems that a taco means something different in each culture and that is cool to see how something changed over time in each culture and what it means in each one!


America’s 75 Best Tacos for 2015 - Recipes

It is important to remember that though tacos are of Mexican origin, there is not an archetypal kind of Mexican taco. Mexican people incorporate the recipes and cooking styles of indigenous and European people into their own. According to Tacopedia, an informative tome written by Déborah Holtz and Juan Carlos Mena, the taco is the focal point of Mexican cuisine. The taco, simply described as a tortilla wrapped around food, is known worldwide for its Mexican roots, and known in Mexico as part of the Mexican culture.

The phrase, “echarse un taco,” to grab a taco, has become so prevalent in Mexico that it is now synonymous with getting any kind of food. Many Mexican sayings incorporate tacos as well, including but not limited to, “Le echas mucha crema a tus tacos,” which means you add a lot of sour cream to your tacos, and describes someone who thinks very, possibly too, highly of himself or herself. Though this is certainly interesting, it is not the only way tacos have been integrated into Mexico’s general culture.

The process of nixtamal is also well-known in Mexico and used to create the tortilla- the soft outer shell of the taco that holds all the ingredients. Maize is boiled in diluted quicklime, and the kernels are left out over night. This allows the mixture of cornmeal and maize flour to become malleable and cohesive. This process dates back to 1,000 and 500 B.C. when the taco was “created” as an edible spoon. Due to its ability to hold a number of foods, Holtz and Mena note that there are many variations of the taco, and they are all ubiquitous in Mexico.

The hard taco shell was created so that Mexican food could travel beyond Mexican culture. The traditional tortilla does not last very long sitting out for twenty-four hours can leave the tortilla stale. The hard shell, however, is fried, wrapped in plastic, and can sit until it needs to be used. This is helpful when goods are being transported out of Mexican communities and spread all over the world.

Even with the many different versions produced by the Mexican people, Tacos still continue to be redesigned all over the world. For example, if one were to ask for tacos in California, he or she may be served smoked marlin tacos: marlin wrapped in a tortilla with cilantro, cabbage, tomatoes, and red onion. If this same question was asked in Sweden, it is likely one will get a Gringa Taco: corn tortilla filled with cheese and seasoned beef, served with salsa, cilantro, and onion. Due to their presence worldwide, tacos have become a defining aspect of Mexican culture.

As you can see, the taco is a strong part of Mexican culture. Its variance makes it even more popular worldwide, and Mexico can take pride in the fact that they have an international presence. This is evident because of the many chain restaurants that were created to serve Mexican food. Just a few examples are Taco Bell, Chipotle, Blue Burrito, and California Tortilla, and interestingly enough, these all exist either on campus or downtown.

3 Comments on The Culture of the Taco

Mgc5166

I remember the first time I realized the versatility of the mighty taco. It was at a birthday party, and up until then, the tacos my mother made were always the same consistent recipe. It blew my toddler mind that a taco could have chicken or pork instead of beef. And reading this makes me feel the epiphany all over again. I also think it’s hilarious that saying someone adds too much sour cream to their tacos is a slight at someone’s lofty ego, and I had no idea that the tortilla was such an old concept. I’m feeling tacos tonight.

Kvl5406

I never thought of a taco as an edible spoon but this realization is kind of mind blowing because that’s really exactly what it is! I will probably never get over that, honestly. I think it’s super interesting that saying “grab a taco” could mean getting any type of food now. It reminds me of how there are some places that call all soda Coke. It’s interesting to see how food and culture are intertwined and how it can even influence language!

Aft5105

Mmmm I may just head to Chipotle after reading this! The history of the taco is quite interesting. That’s amazing that the hard shelled taco can last until ready to be eaten. I have always wondered about the story behind the different types of taco shells. It seems that a taco means something different in each culture and that is cool to see how something changed over time in each culture and what it means in each one!


America’s 75 Best Tacos for 2015 - Recipes

It is important to remember that though tacos are of Mexican origin, there is not an archetypal kind of Mexican taco. Mexican people incorporate the recipes and cooking styles of indigenous and European people into their own. According to Tacopedia, an informative tome written by Déborah Holtz and Juan Carlos Mena, the taco is the focal point of Mexican cuisine. The taco, simply described as a tortilla wrapped around food, is known worldwide for its Mexican roots, and known in Mexico as part of the Mexican culture.

The phrase, “echarse un taco,” to grab a taco, has become so prevalent in Mexico that it is now synonymous with getting any kind of food. Many Mexican sayings incorporate tacos as well, including but not limited to, “Le echas mucha crema a tus tacos,” which means you add a lot of sour cream to your tacos, and describes someone who thinks very, possibly too, highly of himself or herself. Though this is certainly interesting, it is not the only way tacos have been integrated into Mexico’s general culture.

The process of nixtamal is also well-known in Mexico and used to create the tortilla- the soft outer shell of the taco that holds all the ingredients. Maize is boiled in diluted quicklime, and the kernels are left out over night. This allows the mixture of cornmeal and maize flour to become malleable and cohesive. This process dates back to 1,000 and 500 B.C. when the taco was “created” as an edible spoon. Due to its ability to hold a number of foods, Holtz and Mena note that there are many variations of the taco, and they are all ubiquitous in Mexico.

The hard taco shell was created so that Mexican food could travel beyond Mexican culture. The traditional tortilla does not last very long sitting out for twenty-four hours can leave the tortilla stale. The hard shell, however, is fried, wrapped in plastic, and can sit until it needs to be used. This is helpful when goods are being transported out of Mexican communities and spread all over the world.

Even with the many different versions produced by the Mexican people, Tacos still continue to be redesigned all over the world. For example, if one were to ask for tacos in California, he or she may be served smoked marlin tacos: marlin wrapped in a tortilla with cilantro, cabbage, tomatoes, and red onion. If this same question was asked in Sweden, it is likely one will get a Gringa Taco: corn tortilla filled with cheese and seasoned beef, served with salsa, cilantro, and onion. Due to their presence worldwide, tacos have become a defining aspect of Mexican culture.

As you can see, the taco is a strong part of Mexican culture. Its variance makes it even more popular worldwide, and Mexico can take pride in the fact that they have an international presence. This is evident because of the many chain restaurants that were created to serve Mexican food. Just a few examples are Taco Bell, Chipotle, Blue Burrito, and California Tortilla, and interestingly enough, these all exist either on campus or downtown.

3 Comments on The Culture of the Taco

Mgc5166

I remember the first time I realized the versatility of the mighty taco. It was at a birthday party, and up until then, the tacos my mother made were always the same consistent recipe. It blew my toddler mind that a taco could have chicken or pork instead of beef. And reading this makes me feel the epiphany all over again. I also think it’s hilarious that saying someone adds too much sour cream to their tacos is a slight at someone’s lofty ego, and I had no idea that the tortilla was such an old concept. I’m feeling tacos tonight.

Kvl5406

I never thought of a taco as an edible spoon but this realization is kind of mind blowing because that’s really exactly what it is! I will probably never get over that, honestly. I think it’s super interesting that saying “grab a taco” could mean getting any type of food now. It reminds me of how there are some places that call all soda Coke. It’s interesting to see how food and culture are intertwined and how it can even influence language!

Aft5105

Mmmm I may just head to Chipotle after reading this! The history of the taco is quite interesting. That’s amazing that the hard shelled taco can last until ready to be eaten. I have always wondered about the story behind the different types of taco shells. It seems that a taco means something different in each culture and that is cool to see how something changed over time in each culture and what it means in each one!


America’s 75 Best Tacos for 2015 - Recipes

It is important to remember that though tacos are of Mexican origin, there is not an archetypal kind of Mexican taco. Mexican people incorporate the recipes and cooking styles of indigenous and European people into their own. According to Tacopedia, an informative tome written by Déborah Holtz and Juan Carlos Mena, the taco is the focal point of Mexican cuisine. The taco, simply described as a tortilla wrapped around food, is known worldwide for its Mexican roots, and known in Mexico as part of the Mexican culture.

The phrase, “echarse un taco,” to grab a taco, has become so prevalent in Mexico that it is now synonymous with getting any kind of food. Many Mexican sayings incorporate tacos as well, including but not limited to, “Le echas mucha crema a tus tacos,” which means you add a lot of sour cream to your tacos, and describes someone who thinks very, possibly too, highly of himself or herself. Though this is certainly interesting, it is not the only way tacos have been integrated into Mexico’s general culture.

The process of nixtamal is also well-known in Mexico and used to create the tortilla- the soft outer shell of the taco that holds all the ingredients. Maize is boiled in diluted quicklime, and the kernels are left out over night. This allows the mixture of cornmeal and maize flour to become malleable and cohesive. This process dates back to 1,000 and 500 B.C. when the taco was “created” as an edible spoon. Due to its ability to hold a number of foods, Holtz and Mena note that there are many variations of the taco, and they are all ubiquitous in Mexico.

The hard taco shell was created so that Mexican food could travel beyond Mexican culture. The traditional tortilla does not last very long sitting out for twenty-four hours can leave the tortilla stale. The hard shell, however, is fried, wrapped in plastic, and can sit until it needs to be used. This is helpful when goods are being transported out of Mexican communities and spread all over the world.

Even with the many different versions produced by the Mexican people, Tacos still continue to be redesigned all over the world. For example, if one were to ask for tacos in California, he or she may be served smoked marlin tacos: marlin wrapped in a tortilla with cilantro, cabbage, tomatoes, and red onion. If this same question was asked in Sweden, it is likely one will get a Gringa Taco: corn tortilla filled with cheese and seasoned beef, served with salsa, cilantro, and onion. Due to their presence worldwide, tacos have become a defining aspect of Mexican culture.

As you can see, the taco is a strong part of Mexican culture. Its variance makes it even more popular worldwide, and Mexico can take pride in the fact that they have an international presence. This is evident because of the many chain restaurants that were created to serve Mexican food. Just a few examples are Taco Bell, Chipotle, Blue Burrito, and California Tortilla, and interestingly enough, these all exist either on campus or downtown.

3 Comments on The Culture of the Taco

Mgc5166

I remember the first time I realized the versatility of the mighty taco. It was at a birthday party, and up until then, the tacos my mother made were always the same consistent recipe. It blew my toddler mind that a taco could have chicken or pork instead of beef. And reading this makes me feel the epiphany all over again. I also think it’s hilarious that saying someone adds too much sour cream to their tacos is a slight at someone’s lofty ego, and I had no idea that the tortilla was such an old concept. I’m feeling tacos tonight.

Kvl5406

I never thought of a taco as an edible spoon but this realization is kind of mind blowing because that’s really exactly what it is! I will probably never get over that, honestly. I think it’s super interesting that saying “grab a taco” could mean getting any type of food now. It reminds me of how there are some places that call all soda Coke. It’s interesting to see how food and culture are intertwined and how it can even influence language!

Aft5105

Mmmm I may just head to Chipotle after reading this! The history of the taco is quite interesting. That’s amazing that the hard shelled taco can last until ready to be eaten. I have always wondered about the story behind the different types of taco shells. It seems that a taco means something different in each culture and that is cool to see how something changed over time in each culture and what it means in each one!


America’s 75 Best Tacos for 2015 - Recipes

It is important to remember that though tacos are of Mexican origin, there is not an archetypal kind of Mexican taco. Mexican people incorporate the recipes and cooking styles of indigenous and European people into their own. According to Tacopedia, an informative tome written by Déborah Holtz and Juan Carlos Mena, the taco is the focal point of Mexican cuisine. The taco, simply described as a tortilla wrapped around food, is known worldwide for its Mexican roots, and known in Mexico as part of the Mexican culture.

The phrase, “echarse un taco,” to grab a taco, has become so prevalent in Mexico that it is now synonymous with getting any kind of food. Many Mexican sayings incorporate tacos as well, including but not limited to, “Le echas mucha crema a tus tacos,” which means you add a lot of sour cream to your tacos, and describes someone who thinks very, possibly too, highly of himself or herself. Though this is certainly interesting, it is not the only way tacos have been integrated into Mexico’s general culture.

The process of nixtamal is also well-known in Mexico and used to create the tortilla- the soft outer shell of the taco that holds all the ingredients. Maize is boiled in diluted quicklime, and the kernels are left out over night. This allows the mixture of cornmeal and maize flour to become malleable and cohesive. This process dates back to 1,000 and 500 B.C. when the taco was “created” as an edible spoon. Due to its ability to hold a number of foods, Holtz and Mena note that there are many variations of the taco, and they are all ubiquitous in Mexico.

The hard taco shell was created so that Mexican food could travel beyond Mexican culture. The traditional tortilla does not last very long sitting out for twenty-four hours can leave the tortilla stale. The hard shell, however, is fried, wrapped in plastic, and can sit until it needs to be used. This is helpful when goods are being transported out of Mexican communities and spread all over the world.

Even with the many different versions produced by the Mexican people, Tacos still continue to be redesigned all over the world. For example, if one were to ask for tacos in California, he or she may be served smoked marlin tacos: marlin wrapped in a tortilla with cilantro, cabbage, tomatoes, and red onion. If this same question was asked in Sweden, it is likely one will get a Gringa Taco: corn tortilla filled with cheese and seasoned beef, served with salsa, cilantro, and onion. Due to their presence worldwide, tacos have become a defining aspect of Mexican culture.

As you can see, the taco is a strong part of Mexican culture. Its variance makes it even more popular worldwide, and Mexico can take pride in the fact that they have an international presence. This is evident because of the many chain restaurants that were created to serve Mexican food. Just a few examples are Taco Bell, Chipotle, Blue Burrito, and California Tortilla, and interestingly enough, these all exist either on campus or downtown.

3 Comments on The Culture of the Taco

Mgc5166

I remember the first time I realized the versatility of the mighty taco. It was at a birthday party, and up until then, the tacos my mother made were always the same consistent recipe. It blew my toddler mind that a taco could have chicken or pork instead of beef. And reading this makes me feel the epiphany all over again. I also think it’s hilarious that saying someone adds too much sour cream to their tacos is a slight at someone’s lofty ego, and I had no idea that the tortilla was such an old concept. I’m feeling tacos tonight.

Kvl5406

I never thought of a taco as an edible spoon but this realization is kind of mind blowing because that’s really exactly what it is! I will probably never get over that, honestly. I think it’s super interesting that saying “grab a taco” could mean getting any type of food now. It reminds me of how there are some places that call all soda Coke. It’s interesting to see how food and culture are intertwined and how it can even influence language!

Aft5105

Mmmm I may just head to Chipotle after reading this! The history of the taco is quite interesting. That’s amazing that the hard shelled taco can last until ready to be eaten. I have always wondered about the story behind the different types of taco shells. It seems that a taco means something different in each culture and that is cool to see how something changed over time in each culture and what it means in each one!


America’s 75 Best Tacos for 2015 - Recipes

It is important to remember that though tacos are of Mexican origin, there is not an archetypal kind of Mexican taco. Mexican people incorporate the recipes and cooking styles of indigenous and European people into their own. According to Tacopedia, an informative tome written by Déborah Holtz and Juan Carlos Mena, the taco is the focal point of Mexican cuisine. The taco, simply described as a tortilla wrapped around food, is known worldwide for its Mexican roots, and known in Mexico as part of the Mexican culture.

The phrase, “echarse un taco,” to grab a taco, has become so prevalent in Mexico that it is now synonymous with getting any kind of food. Many Mexican sayings incorporate tacos as well, including but not limited to, “Le echas mucha crema a tus tacos,” which means you add a lot of sour cream to your tacos, and describes someone who thinks very, possibly too, highly of himself or herself. Though this is certainly interesting, it is not the only way tacos have been integrated into Mexico’s general culture.

The process of nixtamal is also well-known in Mexico and used to create the tortilla- the soft outer shell of the taco that holds all the ingredients. Maize is boiled in diluted quicklime, and the kernels are left out over night. This allows the mixture of cornmeal and maize flour to become malleable and cohesive. This process dates back to 1,000 and 500 B.C. when the taco was “created” as an edible spoon. Due to its ability to hold a number of foods, Holtz and Mena note that there are many variations of the taco, and they are all ubiquitous in Mexico.

The hard taco shell was created so that Mexican food could travel beyond Mexican culture. The traditional tortilla does not last very long sitting out for twenty-four hours can leave the tortilla stale. The hard shell, however, is fried, wrapped in plastic, and can sit until it needs to be used. This is helpful when goods are being transported out of Mexican communities and spread all over the world.

Even with the many different versions produced by the Mexican people, Tacos still continue to be redesigned all over the world. For example, if one were to ask for tacos in California, he or she may be served smoked marlin tacos: marlin wrapped in a tortilla with cilantro, cabbage, tomatoes, and red onion. If this same question was asked in Sweden, it is likely one will get a Gringa Taco: corn tortilla filled with cheese and seasoned beef, served with salsa, cilantro, and onion. Due to their presence worldwide, tacos have become a defining aspect of Mexican culture.

As you can see, the taco is a strong part of Mexican culture. Its variance makes it even more popular worldwide, and Mexico can take pride in the fact that they have an international presence. This is evident because of the many chain restaurants that were created to serve Mexican food. Just a few examples are Taco Bell, Chipotle, Blue Burrito, and California Tortilla, and interestingly enough, these all exist either on campus or downtown.

3 Comments on The Culture of the Taco

Mgc5166

I remember the first time I realized the versatility of the mighty taco. It was at a birthday party, and up until then, the tacos my mother made were always the same consistent recipe. It blew my toddler mind that a taco could have chicken or pork instead of beef. And reading this makes me feel the epiphany all over again. I also think it’s hilarious that saying someone adds too much sour cream to their tacos is a slight at someone’s lofty ego, and I had no idea that the tortilla was such an old concept. I’m feeling tacos tonight.

Kvl5406

I never thought of a taco as an edible spoon but this realization is kind of mind blowing because that’s really exactly what it is! I will probably never get over that, honestly. I think it’s super interesting that saying “grab a taco” could mean getting any type of food now. It reminds me of how there are some places that call all soda Coke. It’s interesting to see how food and culture are intertwined and how it can even influence language!

Aft5105

Mmmm I may just head to Chipotle after reading this! The history of the taco is quite interesting. That’s amazing that the hard shelled taco can last until ready to be eaten. I have always wondered about the story behind the different types of taco shells. It seems that a taco means something different in each culture and that is cool to see how something changed over time in each culture and what it means in each one!


America’s 75 Best Tacos for 2015 - Recipes

It is important to remember that though tacos are of Mexican origin, there is not an archetypal kind of Mexican taco. Mexican people incorporate the recipes and cooking styles of indigenous and European people into their own. According to Tacopedia, an informative tome written by Déborah Holtz and Juan Carlos Mena, the taco is the focal point of Mexican cuisine. The taco, simply described as a tortilla wrapped around food, is known worldwide for its Mexican roots, and known in Mexico as part of the Mexican culture.

The phrase, “echarse un taco,” to grab a taco, has become so prevalent in Mexico that it is now synonymous with getting any kind of food. Many Mexican sayings incorporate tacos as well, including but not limited to, “Le echas mucha crema a tus tacos,” which means you add a lot of sour cream to your tacos, and describes someone who thinks very, possibly too, highly of himself or herself. Though this is certainly interesting, it is not the only way tacos have been integrated into Mexico’s general culture.

The process of nixtamal is also well-known in Mexico and used to create the tortilla- the soft outer shell of the taco that holds all the ingredients. Maize is boiled in diluted quicklime, and the kernels are left out over night. This allows the mixture of cornmeal and maize flour to become malleable and cohesive. This process dates back to 1,000 and 500 B.C. when the taco was “created” as an edible spoon. Due to its ability to hold a number of foods, Holtz and Mena note that there are many variations of the taco, and they are all ubiquitous in Mexico.

The hard taco shell was created so that Mexican food could travel beyond Mexican culture. The traditional tortilla does not last very long sitting out for twenty-four hours can leave the tortilla stale. The hard shell, however, is fried, wrapped in plastic, and can sit until it needs to be used. This is helpful when goods are being transported out of Mexican communities and spread all over the world.

Even with the many different versions produced by the Mexican people, Tacos still continue to be redesigned all over the world. For example, if one were to ask for tacos in California, he or she may be served smoked marlin tacos: marlin wrapped in a tortilla with cilantro, cabbage, tomatoes, and red onion. If this same question was asked in Sweden, it is likely one will get a Gringa Taco: corn tortilla filled with cheese and seasoned beef, served with salsa, cilantro, and onion. Due to their presence worldwide, tacos have become a defining aspect of Mexican culture.

As you can see, the taco is a strong part of Mexican culture. Its variance makes it even more popular worldwide, and Mexico can take pride in the fact that they have an international presence. This is evident because of the many chain restaurants that were created to serve Mexican food. Just a few examples are Taco Bell, Chipotle, Blue Burrito, and California Tortilla, and interestingly enough, these all exist either on campus or downtown.

3 Comments on The Culture of the Taco

Mgc5166

I remember the first time I realized the versatility of the mighty taco. It was at a birthday party, and up until then, the tacos my mother made were always the same consistent recipe. It blew my toddler mind that a taco could have chicken or pork instead of beef. And reading this makes me feel the epiphany all over again. I also think it’s hilarious that saying someone adds too much sour cream to their tacos is a slight at someone’s lofty ego, and I had no idea that the tortilla was such an old concept. I’m feeling tacos tonight.

Kvl5406

I never thought of a taco as an edible spoon but this realization is kind of mind blowing because that’s really exactly what it is! I will probably never get over that, honestly. I think it’s super interesting that saying “grab a taco” could mean getting any type of food now. It reminds me of how there are some places that call all soda Coke. It’s interesting to see how food and culture are intertwined and how it can even influence language!

Aft5105

Mmmm I may just head to Chipotle after reading this! The history of the taco is quite interesting. That’s amazing that the hard shelled taco can last until ready to be eaten. I have always wondered about the story behind the different types of taco shells. It seems that a taco means something different in each culture and that is cool to see how something changed over time in each culture and what it means in each one!


America’s 75 Best Tacos for 2015 - Recipes

It is important to remember that though tacos are of Mexican origin, there is not an archetypal kind of Mexican taco. Mexican people incorporate the recipes and cooking styles of indigenous and European people into their own. According to Tacopedia, an informative tome written by Déborah Holtz and Juan Carlos Mena, the taco is the focal point of Mexican cuisine. The taco, simply described as a tortilla wrapped around food, is known worldwide for its Mexican roots, and known in Mexico as part of the Mexican culture.

The phrase, “echarse un taco,” to grab a taco, has become so prevalent in Mexico that it is now synonymous with getting any kind of food. Many Mexican sayings incorporate tacos as well, including but not limited to, “Le echas mucha crema a tus tacos,” which means you add a lot of sour cream to your tacos, and describes someone who thinks very, possibly too, highly of himself or herself. Though this is certainly interesting, it is not the only way tacos have been integrated into Mexico’s general culture.

The process of nixtamal is also well-known in Mexico and used to create the tortilla- the soft outer shell of the taco that holds all the ingredients. Maize is boiled in diluted quicklime, and the kernels are left out over night. This allows the mixture of cornmeal and maize flour to become malleable and cohesive. This process dates back to 1,000 and 500 B.C. when the taco was “created” as an edible spoon. Due to its ability to hold a number of foods, Holtz and Mena note that there are many variations of the taco, and they are all ubiquitous in Mexico.

The hard taco shell was created so that Mexican food could travel beyond Mexican culture. The traditional tortilla does not last very long sitting out for twenty-four hours can leave the tortilla stale. The hard shell, however, is fried, wrapped in plastic, and can sit until it needs to be used. This is helpful when goods are being transported out of Mexican communities and spread all over the world.

Even with the many different versions produced by the Mexican people, Tacos still continue to be redesigned all over the world. For example, if one were to ask for tacos in California, he or she may be served smoked marlin tacos: marlin wrapped in a tortilla with cilantro, cabbage, tomatoes, and red onion. If this same question was asked in Sweden, it is likely one will get a Gringa Taco: corn tortilla filled with cheese and seasoned beef, served with salsa, cilantro, and onion. Due to their presence worldwide, tacos have become a defining aspect of Mexican culture.

As you can see, the taco is a strong part of Mexican culture. Its variance makes it even more popular worldwide, and Mexico can take pride in the fact that they have an international presence. This is evident because of the many chain restaurants that were created to serve Mexican food. Just a few examples are Taco Bell, Chipotle, Blue Burrito, and California Tortilla, and interestingly enough, these all exist either on campus or downtown.

3 Comments on The Culture of the Taco

Mgc5166

I remember the first time I realized the versatility of the mighty taco. It was at a birthday party, and up until then, the tacos my mother made were always the same consistent recipe. It blew my toddler mind that a taco could have chicken or pork instead of beef. And reading this makes me feel the epiphany all over again. I also think it’s hilarious that saying someone adds too much sour cream to their tacos is a slight at someone’s lofty ego, and I had no idea that the tortilla was such an old concept. I’m feeling tacos tonight.

Kvl5406

I never thought of a taco as an edible spoon but this realization is kind of mind blowing because that’s really exactly what it is! I will probably never get over that, honestly. I think it’s super interesting that saying “grab a taco” could mean getting any type of food now. It reminds me of how there are some places that call all soda Coke. It’s interesting to see how food and culture are intertwined and how it can even influence language!

Aft5105

Mmmm I may just head to Chipotle after reading this! The history of the taco is quite interesting. That’s amazing that the hard shelled taco can last until ready to be eaten. I have always wondered about the story behind the different types of taco shells. It seems that a taco means something different in each culture and that is cool to see how something changed over time in each culture and what it means in each one!


America’s 75 Best Tacos for 2015 - Recipes

It is important to remember that though tacos are of Mexican origin, there is not an archetypal kind of Mexican taco. Mexican people incorporate the recipes and cooking styles of indigenous and European people into their own. According to Tacopedia, an informative tome written by Déborah Holtz and Juan Carlos Mena, the taco is the focal point of Mexican cuisine. The taco, simply described as a tortilla wrapped around food, is known worldwide for its Mexican roots, and known in Mexico as part of the Mexican culture.

The phrase, “echarse un taco,” to grab a taco, has become so prevalent in Mexico that it is now synonymous with getting any kind of food. Many Mexican sayings incorporate tacos as well, including but not limited to, “Le echas mucha crema a tus tacos,” which means you add a lot of sour cream to your tacos, and describes someone who thinks very, possibly too, highly of himself or herself. Though this is certainly interesting, it is not the only way tacos have been integrated into Mexico’s general culture.

The process of nixtamal is also well-known in Mexico and used to create the tortilla- the soft outer shell of the taco that holds all the ingredients. Maize is boiled in diluted quicklime, and the kernels are left out over night. This allows the mixture of cornmeal and maize flour to become malleable and cohesive. This process dates back to 1,000 and 500 B.C. when the taco was “created” as an edible spoon. Due to its ability to hold a number of foods, Holtz and Mena note that there are many variations of the taco, and they are all ubiquitous in Mexico.

The hard taco shell was created so that Mexican food could travel beyond Mexican culture. The traditional tortilla does not last very long sitting out for twenty-four hours can leave the tortilla stale. The hard shell, however, is fried, wrapped in plastic, and can sit until it needs to be used. This is helpful when goods are being transported out of Mexican communities and spread all over the world.

Even with the many different versions produced by the Mexican people, Tacos still continue to be redesigned all over the world. For example, if one were to ask for tacos in California, he or she may be served smoked marlin tacos: marlin wrapped in a tortilla with cilantro, cabbage, tomatoes, and red onion. If this same question was asked in Sweden, it is likely one will get a Gringa Taco: corn tortilla filled with cheese and seasoned beef, served with salsa, cilantro, and onion. Due to their presence worldwide, tacos have become a defining aspect of Mexican culture.

As you can see, the taco is a strong part of Mexican culture. Its variance makes it even more popular worldwide, and Mexico can take pride in the fact that they have an international presence. This is evident because of the many chain restaurants that were created to serve Mexican food. Just a few examples are Taco Bell, Chipotle, Blue Burrito, and California Tortilla, and interestingly enough, these all exist either on campus or downtown.

3 Comments on The Culture of the Taco

Mgc5166

I remember the first time I realized the versatility of the mighty taco. It was at a birthday party, and up until then, the tacos my mother made were always the same consistent recipe. It blew my toddler mind that a taco could have chicken or pork instead of beef. And reading this makes me feel the epiphany all over again. I also think it’s hilarious that saying someone adds too much sour cream to their tacos is a slight at someone’s lofty ego, and I had no idea that the tortilla was such an old concept. I’m feeling tacos tonight.

Kvl5406

I never thought of a taco as an edible spoon but this realization is kind of mind blowing because that’s really exactly what it is! I will probably never get over that, honestly. I think it’s super interesting that saying “grab a taco” could mean getting any type of food now. It reminds me of how there are some places that call all soda Coke. It’s interesting to see how food and culture are intertwined and how it can even influence language!

Aft5105

Mmmm I may just head to Chipotle after reading this! The history of the taco is quite interesting. That’s amazing that the hard shelled taco can last until ready to be eaten. I have always wondered about the story behind the different types of taco shells. It seems that a taco means something different in each culture and that is cool to see how something changed over time in each culture and what it means in each one!


America’s 75 Best Tacos for 2015 - Recipes

It is important to remember that though tacos are of Mexican origin, there is not an archetypal kind of Mexican taco. Mexican people incorporate the recipes and cooking styles of indigenous and European people into their own. According to Tacopedia, an informative tome written by Déborah Holtz and Juan Carlos Mena, the taco is the focal point of Mexican cuisine. The taco, simply described as a tortilla wrapped around food, is known worldwide for its Mexican roots, and known in Mexico as part of the Mexican culture.

The phrase, “echarse un taco,” to grab a taco, has become so prevalent in Mexico that it is now synonymous with getting any kind of food. Many Mexican sayings incorporate tacos as well, including but not limited to, “Le echas mucha crema a tus tacos,” which means you add a lot of sour cream to your tacos, and describes someone who thinks very, possibly too, highly of himself or herself. Though this is certainly interesting, it is not the only way tacos have been integrated into Mexico’s general culture.

The process of nixtamal is also well-known in Mexico and used to create the tortilla- the soft outer shell of the taco that holds all the ingredients. Maize is boiled in diluted quicklime, and the kernels are left out over night. This allows the mixture of cornmeal and maize flour to become malleable and cohesive. This process dates back to 1,000 and 500 B.C. when the taco was “created” as an edible spoon. Due to its ability to hold a number of foods, Holtz and Mena note that there are many variations of the taco, and they are all ubiquitous in Mexico.

The hard taco shell was created so that Mexican food could travel beyond Mexican culture. The traditional tortilla does not last very long sitting out for twenty-four hours can leave the tortilla stale. The hard shell, however, is fried, wrapped in plastic, and can sit until it needs to be used. This is helpful when goods are being transported out of Mexican communities and spread all over the world.

Even with the many different versions produced by the Mexican people, Tacos still continue to be redesigned all over the world. For example, if one were to ask for tacos in California, he or she may be served smoked marlin tacos: marlin wrapped in a tortilla with cilantro, cabbage, tomatoes, and red onion. If this same question was asked in Sweden, it is likely one will get a Gringa Taco: corn tortilla filled with cheese and seasoned beef, served with salsa, cilantro, and onion. Due to their presence worldwide, tacos have become a defining aspect of Mexican culture.

As you can see, the taco is a strong part of Mexican culture. Its variance makes it even more popular worldwide, and Mexico can take pride in the fact that they have an international presence. This is evident because of the many chain restaurants that were created to serve Mexican food. Just a few examples are Taco Bell, Chipotle, Blue Burrito, and California Tortilla, and interestingly enough, these all exist either on campus or downtown.

3 Comments on The Culture of the Taco

Mgc5166

I remember the first time I realized the versatility of the mighty taco. It was at a birthday party, and up until then, the tacos my mother made were always the same consistent recipe. It blew my toddler mind that a taco could have chicken or pork instead of beef. And reading this makes me feel the epiphany all over again. I also think it’s hilarious that saying someone adds too much sour cream to their tacos is a slight at someone’s lofty ego, and I had no idea that the tortilla was such an old concept. I’m feeling tacos tonight.

Kvl5406

I never thought of a taco as an edible spoon but this realization is kind of mind blowing because that’s really exactly what it is! I will probably never get over that, honestly. I think it’s super interesting that saying “grab a taco” could mean getting any type of food now. It reminds me of how there are some places that call all soda Coke. It’s interesting to see how food and culture are intertwined and how it can even influence language!

Aft5105

Mmmm I may just head to Chipotle after reading this! The history of the taco is quite interesting. That’s amazing that the hard shelled taco can last until ready to be eaten. I have always wondered about the story behind the different types of taco shells. It seems that a taco means something different in each culture and that is cool to see how something changed over time in each culture and what it means in each one!


Watch the video: Satisfying Relaxing with Sac Dep Spa #402