New recipes

Spring awakening recipe

Spring awakening recipe


  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Drink
  • Cocktails
  • Vodka cocktails

Created with Woodruff syrup, the spring awakening bursts with freshness and flavour. Originating from Berlin, Woodruff syrup is an electric green sweet syrup that was once used for flavouring wines and even sausages!

1 person made this

IngredientsServes: 1

  • 35ml Skyy® vodka
  • 25ml apple juice
  • 25ml Woodruff syrup
  • 15ml lime juice
  • raspberries, to garnish

MethodPrep:8min ›Ready in:8min

  1. Fill a cocktail shaker with ice cubes then add all of the ingredients. Firmly place the top of the shaker on and shake well for a minute or two. Strain into a chilled martini glass then garnish with raspberries and serve immediately.

See it on my blog

Recently viewed

Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(0)

Reviews in English (0)


Exclusive: Two Musically Delicious Recipes From Break an Egg: The Broadway Cookbook

Author Tara Theoharis’s cookbook with recipes inspired by classic musicals, Break an Egg, is coming out on September 1st, 2020, but we can share two of the tasty recipes to get your Broadway cooking on posthaste.

Theoharis also writes the popular blog The Geeky Hostess, “a fandom-inspired recipe and party site,” and she definitely knows her musical theater geeks. I gasped at the Spring Awakening-inspired oysters, which are called, perfectly, “Totally Shucked.”

We’ll have that recipe and another for Laurey’s famous tarts from Oklahoma!, but first let’s take a look at a few of the other recipes titles that will be available in Break an Egg. The cookbook seems like it will be the perfect gift for theater kids in your life (maybe that’s you!) as well as anyone who likes a bit of punnery.

  • The Wizard and Ice – Wicked
  • Schnitzel With Noodles – The Sound of Music
  • Eggrolls for Mr. Goldstone – Gypsy
  • Too Darn Hot Sauce – Kiss Me, Kate
  • Another Vodka Stinger – Company
  • Mama’s Well-Peppered Ragu – Chicago

The recipes cover a range of food from appetizers to cocktails to dessert and back, and there are 55 recipes in all, “from Oklahoma! to Hamilton.”

This year, I fell head-over-heels in love with the Oklahoma! Broadway revival, a sexy, stunning update to the longtime classic. In the show, which I saw too many times for my bank account, an auction of ladies’ prepared picnic hampers becomes a dramatic show-down. The auction, ostensibly to benefit the schoolhouse, morphs into the tense turning point face-off between hero Curly and antagonist Jud Fry, both of whom are vying for the lovely Laurey’s picnic hamper. Laurey had baked gooseberry tarts, and in Break An Egg, you’ll find a yummy tart recipe—substituting strawberries and rhubarb for gooseberries, which may be harder to track down.

Now about those Spring Awakening-inspired oysters. Spring Awakening, the Duncan Sheik/Steven Sater rock musical based on an 1891 play by Frank Wedekind, is full of raging hormones and heaping doses of angst. One of the show’s stand-out songs (of many!) is called “Totally F*cked,” which is how we arrive at “Totally Shucked.” And what more fitting dish to prepare than oysters, that alleged aphrodisiac? Cheesy broiled oysters, you say?

Let’s take a look at the results. Yeah, we’re shucked all right:

You can pre-order Break an Egg: The Broadway Cookbook right now so that it arrives in September. If you’re in the mood, let’s dream up some other Broadway recipes that play on musicals in the comments. Red and black cookies for Les Mis? Pasta with meatless balls from RENT? Do I dare suggest a Sweeney Todd pot pie?

—The Mary Sue has a strict comment policy that forbids, but is not limited to, personal insults toward anyone, hate speech, and trolling.—


Spring Awakening Toast

Spring, is that you? Wave goodbye to winter and say hello to the season of new beginnings with our Spring Awakening Toast. It’s fresh strawberries, cool cucumber, and earthy pine nuts piled on top of a gut-healthy spread of our tart and tangy farmer cheese and toasted bread. Strawberries are an excellent source of vitamin C to support immune health cucumbers are made of 96% water and contain antioxidants, which are molecules that neutralize free radicals roaming throughout the body and protect cells from oxidative stress and farmer cheese is an Eastern European soft cheese that may balance the microbiome and support immunity with its 13 grams of protein per serving and 12 live and active probiotic cultures. It’s the tasteful way to celebrate Toast Tuesday.

Your Gut Matters

Eating habits also play a role in mental health. Research has shown that probiotic-rich foods decrease anxiety and boost the mood. That makes kefir a great wellbeing tool because it contains 12 live and probiotic cultures. Psychiatrist James Greenblatt explained that “‘the gut is really your second brain. There are more neurons in the GI tract than anywhere else except the brain.’” As research continues to develop, it’s becoming more and more apparent that there is a link between the gut and the brain. What was once suspected as one-way communication (brain to gut) is now understood to be more of a two-way system. Thus, the health of our gut may directly impact the health of our minds.

Prebiotics + Probiotics = a Healthy You

Prebiotics are non-living, non-digestible carbohydrates naturally found in a variety of foods. Your body actually can’t digest prebiotics, so they’re what probiotics feed off of to remain actively working in your digestive system. They help the digestive system by promoting the growth of good bacteria. Prebiotics and probiotics work together in balance to make sure our digestive system stays on track and regular. Research has found that consuming a variety of prebiotic and probiotic food sources may improve your body’s natural functions, including both your immune and digestive system.

With increasing research linking the correlation between probiotics, gut health, and immunity, it’s no secret that the integrity of our gut is vital to our health. Although additional factors such as stress, antibiotic usage, and individual health conditions can contribute to the condition of our gut, a focus on healthy food choices is one of the easiest ways to support the microbiome.


Recipes

Salt the chinese cabbage, then pour over the water and stew it. Once stewed, blend it into puree and freeze it. Cover with cheesecloth and defrost it on perforated metal rack. Save theclear liquid that drips from the cheeseclothand testit with constant tasting.Add some Kudzu starch to have right consistency and add a tiny bit of butter to be emulsified.

Bamboo shoot

Cut both tips off the bamboo shoot skin.Put water, bamboo shoot, rice bran and chili pepper into a saucepan beforebringing the water to a boil.Simmer until bamboo is cooked and then set aside tocooldown. Once cooled, peel it and cut into half.

Monkfish liver

Clean the veins off from monkfish liver.Season with salt and drizzle some Sake onto it.Roll with wrapping paper and steam. After it has cooled down, char it with a blow torch it and then mash it into rough puree.

Mushroom sand

Mince mushrooms and shallot. Saute it altogether in the pan until it goes brown and turns into powder.

Saute the bamboo shoot, place the raw wakame & monkfish liver puree. Pour the Chinese cabbage sauce and plate Bamboo shoot. Sprinkle mushroom powdered sand.

Find out more about Shinobu’s culinary career

Subscribe Here To FOUR Magazine

Support the FOUR Foundation

Rodolfo Guzmán | Modern mapuche man

Celebrating Chile’s native roots, Rodolfo Guzmán has put the Latin American country on the culinary map at his restaurant Boragó, writes Sophie Cater.

Andreas Caminada shows off his culinary talents with this striking recipe for tongue with apple jelly and wasabi mayonnaise.

Fried oyster with orange mayonnaise

World renowned chef Janez Bratovz shows you how to make this simple but bold oyster recipe…Enjoy!

Fat of the Land | Humble Roots

Sybil Kapoor explores the Kochi Prefecture in Japan in search of the yuzu – a citrus fruit and Asian cooking staple that’s growing in international stature.


Wild garlic pesto

you’ll need&hellip

100g wild garlic
50g hard italian cheese*, grated
50g pepitas (green-colored pumpkin seeds)
juice of half a lemon
4-5 TB extra-virgin olive oil
approx half a cup of water
salt & pepper to taste

1. wash the wild garlic, then chop it (stems and all) and throw it into a blender or food processor.

2. dry toast (no oil) the seeds in a frying pan on the stove on low heat. watch their condition carefully – you want them to taste and smell deliciously toasty and nutty. after a few minutes, quickly remove from heat and place in another bowl or plate. be careful not to just leave them in the pan because they&rsquoll continue toasting even off the heat.

3. throw the garlic first into the blender/food processor, then the cheese and pepitas, then juice and oil on top. use about a ¼ cup of water at first if you are using a blender, only a tablespoon or so if using a food processor.

4. blend & puree for about 4-5 minutes or until contents are as smooth as you can make them.

5. add a pinch of salt and pepper and blend again. taste and add more if you&rsquod like.

6. if you are working with a blender, and it&rsquos not blending well, continue adding a glug of oil and a splash of water (in equal parts) until things get moving. but only as much just things get moving.

7. put into a jar or use immediately in pasta, as a spread on bruschetta or toast, or really anywhere to add some flavor to your meals.

note: makes one jam-size jar. will stay fresh in the fridge for at least a week, but place into a freezer-safe container and freeze if you want it to stick around longer.

*this recipe can be easily made vegan by subbing 2 TB nutritional yeast

and a couple extra pinches of salt for the cheese. i’ve been doing it like this most of the time, lately!

i love using it with tagliatelle, but i&rsquove also used it as a base for these schmancy appetizers i made, or in this recipe with asparagus, tomatoes, and poached eggs to give the dish a little more oomphf.

what spring produce inspires you?

i’m so looking forward to this holiday weekend! for half of it, i’ll be visiting a place in the czech republic that i have been wanting to go to for years and am beyond enthused about it to finally be going there! you can tag along on instagram, if you’d like. x


Spring Awakening

Beth Nydick, co-author of Clean Cocktails is back with us this week as we get ready to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day this weekend! This clean, green, cocktail uses the power and flavors of lemon and basil to create a beautiful green color (that won’t turn you off) and actually REDUCE inflammation in the body! Plus I love it’s name: Spring Awakening! Yes please!

Basil is loaded with antioxidants, which help your body remove toxins and can protect your white blood cells. And has even been found to help fight cancer! On top of all that it’s antibacterial AND contains what’s known as adaptogens - which are elements that help your body manage stress! Just in case the gin wasn’t doing it for ya!

Then there’s the lemon which is also antibacterial and antiviral! Loaded with Vitamin C lemon supports weight loss, detoxifies the body and reduces inflammation. These are the elements that I LOVE about Clean Cocktails. Because you really can find balance in a healthy lifestyle.

Check out the video and grab the recipe below! Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

Spring Awakening
Serves 1

1 small bunch basil leaves
3 oz. vodka or gin
1/2 oz. basil syrup
Zest of 1/2 a lemon
Ice
Seltzer water
Garnish: basil leaves & lemon twist

For the Basil Syrup:
1 C. honey
1 C. filtered water
1 C. fresh basil leaves

Basil Syrup (Beth’s “quick & dirty” version): Combine all of the ingredients in a Vitamin, puree until smooth. Strain into ice cube trays and freeze for later use! (Get the full recipe in Clean Cocktails).

Spring Awakening: Muddle most of the basil leaves with the vodka/gin, basil syrup and lemon zest on a cocktail shaker. Add the ice and shake until your hands get cold.

Strain the contents of the shaker into an ice-filled rock glass and top off with seltzer. Garnish with remaining basil leaves and a lemon twist and serve.


DIY Spring Aromas

Spring is upon us and with it comes many adventures from cleaning out all the nooks and crannies of your home to long road trips exploring faraway trails. When I'm coming out of winter blues I need something to help reawaken my spirits, refresh my mind, and help me smell wonderful on the go! I sat down with our lovely aromatherapist Christine to put together some spring aroma blends for each moment of this blossoming season.

Each of these recipes produces just a small amount, a test batch let's say. If you have been dabbling your toes in the aromatherapy world, this will be a fun opportunity to play around with making a small test batch and then multiplying it for a recipe of your choice. Below each of the recipes is a suggested use for the blend - by no means are those suggestions the limitations of this scent! Enjoy them however you'd like, use each recipe in a different way, or try all of the blends and pick your favorite to use in all of these recipes.

Recipe 1: Out to Play

A sweet and playful blend bound to excite the senses. Benzoin is a cost effective replacement for vanilla in recipes and excellent for gentle DIY skin care products. The fruity carrot seed and sweet orange combination make this an exciting and delightful blend, perfect for wearing on your body, especially during sunny adventures!

Ingredients

  • 4 drops organic Benzoin essential oil
  • 4 drops organic Sweet Orange essential oil
  • 3 drops organic Carrot Seed essential oil

Suggested use: Great as a solid perfume or mixed with jojoba oil in a roll top bottle which can be found here. If you want to make a solid perfume, you can follow our balm base recipe here and simply replace the organic essential oil blend with the Out to Play recipe, multiplying the ingredient measurements above by 7. If blending for a roll top bottle, make sure your essential oil blend doesn't constitute more than 1-2% of your total blend. This means in a 1 oz bottle you would want no more than 6-12 drops of essential oil. If you have questions or want to learn more about converting drops to ml to oz you can check out our handy conversion guide!

Recipe 2: Soft Clean Breeze

This is a soft smelling and cleansing combination of powerful citrus laced with the delicately spicy nutmeg, topped off with a touch of fresh fir needle.

Ingredients

  • 5 drops organic Lavender essential oil
  • 6 drops organic Grapefruit essential oil
  • 4 drops organic Fir Needle essential oil
  • 1 drop organic Nutmeg essential oil

Suggested use: This blend will work great as an air freshener. A perfect way to diffuse essential oils in your car is by using one of our Terra Cotta Pendant Diffusers. Simply place a couple drops of this blend onto a pendant and enjoy the luxurious car scents for weeks to come!

Recipe 3: Awakening

A wonderfully sharp and penetrating combination of petitgrain, uplifting rosemary, with balancing and energizing eucalyptus. Great for pulling your spirits right out of that winter muck.

Ingredients

  • 5 drops organic Petitgrain (combave or regular) essential oil
  • 3 drops organic Rosemary essential oil
  • 2 drop organic Eucalyptus essential oil

Suggested use: Drip oils together in a glass spray bottle and mix by rolling the bottle between the palms of your hands. Pour 1 oz organic witch hazel extract to the top of the bottle and shake well. Spray in the air or on the body when in need of a smile.

Recipe 4: Spring Flowers

A royal blend of floral scents because nothing says "spring!" like blossoming flowers! If you are lucky enough to have both of these luxurious essential oils around your house, get ready for a treat. If you have one or the other or don't want to overindulge on your essential oil collection, you can replace lavender for either of these floral oils to create an impressive scent, sure to please guests from far off lands.

Ingredients

Suggested use: In a diffuser of your choice, add 1-2 drops at a time of the blend and diffuse per the instructions. Enjoy!

Written by Alieta on March 25, 2014

Alieta, blog contributor, is an Oregon native with a two-year certificate from the Columbines School of Botanical Studies. Her other professional accreditations include: a degree in Computer Science at Oregon State University, a degree in Philosophy, Spanish, and Graphic Design from Portland State University, a scuba diving certification, and non-violent communication training. She enjoys spending her free time hiking in the woods with her Labradoodle, Pepperoni, or enjoying the view from her garden with her cat and a bubbly beverage. And winning the local Eugene hackathon!


Spring awakening recipe - Recipes

Pumpkin Spice Cinnamon Rolls

I’m a sucker for anything pumpkin spice. Now, don’t get me wrong, I enjoy pumpkin flavoring as well, but it’s the spice that gets me. That perfect mix of cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, and cloves just makes me feel warm, cozy, and ready for the holidays. So the first day the [&hellip]

“Mummy” Breakfast Sausages

Halloween is finally on a Saturday! While Trick or Treating and large parties won’t (and shouldn’t) be happening in the middle of a pandemic, that won’t stop me from celebrating! I recommend sleeping in then making some of these mummy sausages to go with your batch of pumpkin spice cinnamon [&hellip]

The Best Salted Dark Chocolate Chip Cookies

Living through a Pandemic can really work up your appetite for cookies, can’t it? And now that Fall has hit Seattle, there’s nothing I want to do more on a chilly, rainy day than turn on the oven and make the whole house smell like cookies. When baking, I’ll often [&hellip]

Totally Shucked from Break an Egg! Cookbook

Break an Egg!: A Broadway Cookbook won’t be here until September 1st, but I’ve got a couple sneak peek recipes to hold you over. Today: a broiled oyster recipe and one of my favorite puns of the book: “Totally Shucked” inspired by Spring Awakening! Yeah, you’re shucked all right. You [&hellip]

Laurey’s Prize-Winning Tarts from Break an Egg! Cookbook

Break an Egg!: A Broadway Cookbook won’t be here until September 1st, but I’ve got a couple sneak peek recipes to hold you over. The first: this delicious strawberry rhubarb tart inspired by Oklahoma! Want the farmers and the cowmen to fight over your picnic hamper at the annual auction? [&hellip]

A Refreshing Autumn Mocktail with Moscow Muled

I have been craving Fall. I want cool breezes, crunchy leaves, apple, pumpkin, and cinnamon everything, and sweaters. So many sweaters. However, it is currently sunny and 80 degrees in Seattle. So I’m dreaming of cooler days while clutching this icy autumn drink. This mocktail (or cocktail, if you add [&hellip]

Boyle’s Meatball Subs from Brooklyn 99

I have a few shows I re-watch whenever I need a pick-me-up, and Brooklyn 99 has started to become one of those. And while I’m an Amy all the way, I often feel for Boyle and his ridiculous food obsession. In the episode “The Negotiation” Boyle decides to open a [&hellip]

Rebetzel’s Pretzel Recipe from Crazy Ex-Girlfriend

Tonight is the series finale of Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, the most amazing musical comedy that deals with super important conversations about mental health and relationships. And pretzels. Rebecca, the main character, loves soft pretzels (as everyone should) and ends up owning her own pretzel shop in season 4 titled “Rebetzel’s”. In [&hellip]

Life is Strange 2’s “Home Alone Pasta Delight”

The second episode of Life is Strange 2 launched today, so I thought I’d celebrate by remembering the one part of the first episode that didn’t make me cry–the dad’s delightful pasta recipe. This recipe was found on the side of the fridge–it’s meant to be an easy recipe for [&hellip]

Ice Plains Biome Bark from The Minecrafter’s Cookbook

Today is the day! It’s The Minecrafter’s Cookbook‘s birthday! I’m beyond excited. I’m celebrating with one more recipe from the book. This white chocolate bark is extremely simple to make and can be customized any way you choose–add sprinkles, different fruits, or even some peppermint extract. This one is based [&hellip]

creator of geeky recipes, parties, and products.

I'm a lawful good Hufflepuff who wants to be Leslie Knope when she grows up.


Recipes

Salt the chinese cabbage, then pour over the water and stew it. Once stewed, blend it into puree and freeze it. Cover with cheesecloth and defrost it on perforated metal rack. Save theclear liquid that drips from the cheeseclothand testit with constant tasting.Add some Kudzu starch to have right consistency and add a tiny bit of butter to be emulsified.

Bamboo shoot

Cut both tips off the bamboo shoot skin.Put water, bamboo shoot, rice bran and chili pepper into a saucepan beforebringing the water to a boil.Simmer until bamboo is cooked and then set aside tocooldown. Once cooled, peel it and cut into half.

Monkfish liver

Clean the veins off from monkfish liver.Season with salt and drizzle some Sake onto it.Roll with wrapping paper and steam. After it has cooled down, char it with a blow torch it and then mash it into rough puree.

Mushroom sand

Mince mushrooms and shallot. Saute it altogether in the pan until it goes brown and turns into powder.

Saute the bamboo shoot, place the raw wakame & monkfish liver puree. Pour the Chinese cabbage sauce and plate Bamboo shoot. Sprinkle mushroom powdered sand.

Find out more about Shinobu’s culinary career

Subscribe Here To FOUR Magazine

Support the FOUR Foundation

Rodolfo Guzmán | Modern mapuche man

Celebrating Chile’s native roots, Rodolfo Guzmán has put the Latin American country on the culinary map at his restaurant Boragó, writes Sophie Cater.

Andreas Caminada shows off his culinary talents with this striking recipe for tongue with apple jelly and wasabi mayonnaise.

Fried oyster with orange mayonnaise

World renowned chef Janez Bratovz shows you how to make this simple but bold oyster recipe…Enjoy!

Fat of the Land | Humble Roots

Sybil Kapoor explores the Kochi Prefecture in Japan in search of the yuzu – a citrus fruit and Asian cooking staple that’s growing in international stature.


Spring Awakening

I have to admit that I haven’t had the easiest of winters. The obscene amount of cold temperatures and snow I had to endure were only part of it. In January I was laid off from my new engineering job. After only four months. The company just ran out of work.

I was kind of surprised at my lack of a response to it. I didn’t cry, I didn’t get mad, I just kind of said “oh well.” However, I did find myself slipping into a depression. You might have noticed a decrease in my posts over the past few months as a result.

My enthusiasm for everything dwindled. I kept busy with my photography and chores around the house, but I had a dark cloud over my head. I had ideas of doing things, leaving the house, but couldn’t summon up the momentum needed. Depression sufferers will know what I’m talking about. I have a feeling many readers who have IBS have also experienced depression, as the two seem to go hand in hand. I’ve suffered from both for at least fifteen years now. Winters are the most difficult for me.

I finally started to feel the cloud lift last month, only to be hit with two viruses within two weeks of each other. Now, I’m back, but with a lingering cough and a box of tissues my by side. In between my depression and flu/colds, I managed to work on some recipes and I’m ready to share them. Some are still in in the works after many, many attempts, resulting in my wondering if I will ever get them to work and if I do actually have any talent in recipe development at all. However, all is not lost because I did get some recipes to work and I will be sharing them with you in the weeks to come.


Watch the video: Spring Awakening. #cook90. Epicurious